Tag Archives: tips

What To Include In A Portfolio For A Job Interview

Filed under: Post Grad and Career, Tips - Angelina
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Cameron Tranchemontagne BookRenter Blogger Biography

Okay new college graduates; are you ready for your next job interview? You may have a resume, a cover letter, and bought some sharp business attire, but do you have a career portfolio? Do you even know what a career portfolio is? If you want to make sure you get the job, consider building a career portfolio.

This short guide will help get you started on what to include in a portfolio:

1. What Is A Career Portfolio?

Where a resume provides a snapshot of your experience and background, and a cover letter focuses on why you’re applying for a job, a portfolio is the culmination of all of your career’s work organized in one place. It can be physical or digital, and can help fill in the gaps between your resume and cover letter, or even emphasize accomplishments and skills. It is a way to express who you are as a professional, so make sure it looks its best and presents you in the best light.

2. What To Include

The truth is, you can put whatever you want in your portfolio, but keep in mind that this is a reflection of your career, so choose wisely. You want to include things that back up your resume with physical evidence. If you mention an article on your resume, feature it in your portfolio to show your potential future employer. You should also summarize your career so far and mention what your business goals are for the next 3-5 years. Your career summary is also a good place to talk about your own values and ethics in the workplace. Include a copy of your resume after your career summary, and then get into the samples of your work and any awards or honors you may have earned. Letters of reference are also a great resource to include here.

3. Presentation And Format

Don’t forget it’s not just about the content – the presentation and organization of it all is just as important. You want it to appear like a well prepared PowerPoint: simple, straightforward, and not too elaborate. If you are creating a physical portfolio, consider buying some kind of nice organizational binder to give it that professional look. A digital portfolio may be a better option if you need to send anything in an email or include to a personal website. Digital portfolios allow a little more flexibility in design and you can always print one as a physical copy too. I recommend bringing the physical copy as a backup to the digital copy just in case anyway. Just make sure your overall presentation is professional and memorable.

Having a portfolio will allow you to showcase your skills firsthand rather than just talk about them. It’s easier for a potential employer to realize you are qualified for a job if you show them samples of work that you’ve already done that they are looking for as part of the job description.

Go get started on making that portfolio! Or, go spruce up your existing one if you already have one. It’s always best to be prepared and put your best foot forward!

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Easy 5 Minute Workout You Can Try Right Now

Filed under: College Life, Health & Fitness, Living, Tips - Angelina
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Christine Henson BookRenter Blogger Biography

 

 

 

 

Do you want to get in shape, but have trouble finding the time to get those workouts in? If so, you are not alone! Workouts don’t have to take up a lot of your time. The most important thing is to get up and get moving.

Here is an easy workout to get you moving – and the best part is it’s only five minutes!

1. Warm Up

For a simple warm up, do 30 seconds of jumping jacks and another 30 seconds of jogging in place. This should get your body warmed up and ready to go!

2. Bicep Curls

For this, you’ll need a heavier set of dumb-bells and a lighter set of dumb-bells. Start with your heavier set of weights and do bicep curls for 30 seconds. Then switch to your lighter set of weights and continue this exercise for another 30 seconds.

3. Squats

Now it’s time to work the lower half of your body! Stand with your feet shoulder width apart, bend at your knees, get low enough that your hamstrings are parallel to the floor, and then stand back up. Remember to keep your back straight the entire time. Do these squats for one minute.

4. Plank

For this exercise, start lying on your stomach. Then hold yourself up using your forearms and toes, keep your back flat, and hold this position for one minute. Remember to breathe through this one!

5. Lunges

For this exercise you’ll want to start with your feet together, then step forward with one leg into a lunging position, then step back together, and repeat on the other leg. Continue these moves for one minute.

So there you have it, a simple workout you can do in five minutes! You can even do these in the quad or in your dorm, or anywhere. Pair this with eating right and drinking lots of water, and you’ll be on your way to achieving your fitness goals in no time!

Share your favorite quick exercises in a comment below!

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The Ultimate Guide For College Finals

Filed under: College Life, Education, Tips - Angelina
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Serena Piper BookRenter Blogger Biography

 

 

 

 

Are you freaking out about college finals? Relax; it’s only natural! Pretty much every student has worried about finals at some point. It’s always helped calm me down to remember that I’m not the only one stressing over finals week. We’re in this together!

Throughout my four years of college, I’ve learned a handful of study tips that I’ve come back to time and time again. Here is my guide to college finals:

1. Prioritize

It was easier for me to prioritize what to study, instead of trying to make sure I spent equal amounts of time studying for each final. There are several ways you can decide which final to study for first: the one you’re most worried about passing, the final you’ll have first, or the final that has the most material. I think the safe rule to play by is focusing more of your time on the tests you’re most worried about. Familiarize yourself with enough of all of your material to feel a general confidence.

2. Create Study Guides

If you’re a procrastinator (like yours truly), the sooner you start this step, the better! Many professors will provide their own version of a study guide, but it may not be laid out in a way that makes sense to you. It would be wise to type out (or re-write) all of your notes you’ve taken throughout the term and make a packet of important terms, diagrams, theories, examples, etc. Take the time to create your own study guide. Flashcards are also great, too.

3. Do the Practice Tests

Does your professor create practice tests for each chapter? Are there some in your textbook at the end of each section? I used to pass them by, too, but for some classes, they can be really helpful, especially math. Practice does make perfect!

4. Take Your Time

When it is crunch time and you’re sitting in your seat during the final, take your time! I used to panic if I saw someone turn in their test only after 20. I would think maybe the final was really simple and it shouldn’t be taking me so long to finish it. Wrong. Just because someone else finished before me, that doesn’t mean anything about the test itself. We all work at our own pace. So read the problem slowly and think about your answer. Don’t rush and don’t worry about others around you.

5. Attend Review Sessions

Even if it’s during the time of your favorite television show, make sure you’re at the final exam review session! It’s never a bad thing to be over-prepared. There is no such thing as too much reviewing. Plus, your instructor might tell you something only those at the review session have the advantage of knowing. This is also your last chance to ask any questions you might have.

Follow this guide to college finals and you should do just fine.

Relax, you’ve got this! Keep calm and study on! Good luck!

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Preparing For College Class Registration

Filed under: College Life, Education, Tips - Angelina
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Cameron Tranchemontagne BookRenter Blogger Biography

Sometimes registering for college courses can be extremely stressful and chaotic. You may not know what you actually need to take for credits to graduate, or which general education classes are the easiest so you can focus on your thesis, or maybe even you’re a freshman and you have no idea where to begin.

Take a breath and read this quick class registration guide to help steer you in the right direction:

1. Preparation

If you’re a returning student, take a look at the classes you’ve already taken. How many credits have you completed and how many do you still need to complete? What are you goals? What else are you interested in (besides your major) that you could maybe take to complement your major? There’s a lot of questions to ask yourself to help you prepare for your next set of courses. After answering these questions, you should have a clearer picture about what classes you should apply for. It may help to write this all down so you can see your plan in front of you and follow it like a checklist.

2. Meet With Your Advisor

The next thing you need to do is meet with your advisor. In most cases, you can’t get your online registration access code until you meet with them anyway, but they can also be helpful. You might have to schedule a time for a meeting, so try to do this sooner than later, even if you haven’t finished your preparation yet. Just make sure you have somewhat of a plan by the time of the meeting. Don’t forget that the point of an advisor is to advise you on your college path, so if you’re stuck, your advisor is there to help you.

3. Register

The last thing you need to do is actually register. This should be easy if you’re prepared. Search for the classes you need by their course registration number so that you make sure you get the exact class and section you want. Go for your priority classes first, the ones you need to graduate, and then you can worry about the others. Try to be the first to log on if registration is online because most of the time the classes are first come, first serve. If you don’t get into one before it fills up, this is where having a back-up plan on hand comes in handy. And if you still don’t get everything you need, your advisor and the professor may be able to pull some strings for you, so don’t be afraid to ask!

It’s normal to not get every class you want, so don’t let it stress you out. It will all work out just fine.

Share a comment with us about your class registration tips!

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How To Write The Perfect Paper

Filed under: College Life, Education, Tips - Angelina
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Megan Lehman BookRenter Blogger Biography

 

Every college student writes papers and assignments. What is surprising though is how poorly written some college papers can be. I am a writing fellow at the University of Iowa, where we boast our writing program as being number one in the country.  After reading, reviewing, and editing many papers on many different topics, I have noticed some common mistakes students make when writing a paper.

I’ve put together a quick list of tips to avoid these errors and write the perfect paper:

1. Outline

When I first learned how to outline a paper, I thought it was an enormous waste of my time and that I didn’t need to make outline because I could think my paper through while writing it out. Well, after writing my thesis, a paper that required more work than anything I’ve ever had to do before, I learned the true value in an outline. I got to the second half of my thesis paper and found it extremely difficult to know where the paper was going. Outlining all my ideas gave me the opportunity to see what would work well and what would not. Take the extra hour or so to make the outline. This will allow you to clearly layout your thoughts and keep organized. It’s a lot easier to move thoughts on an outline around than it is to re-write a whole section of your paper!

2. Read It Out Loud

I know this sounds silly, but reading your paper aloud to yourself is by far the easiest and most simple way to find errors in your writing. Things like inappropriate commas and run-on sentences are overwhelmingly common in papers, from the junior high level all the way up to the graduating college seniors.  By reading it out loud, you can hear all these simple mistakes.

3. Writing Centers and Tutors

Your college writing center is an obvious way to improve your writing. After surveying students on multiple campuses, I learned that most students avoid the writing center for a few reasons: they don’t want to hear bad things about their writing, they don’t want to take the time to make or attend the appointment, or they may not even know about it. I understand the busy schedule of a college student. However, the writing center is designed to help you, so make time. Plus, you already pay for this service in your tuition. So, you should use what you’re paying for!

I am shocked every time I read college-level papers. It’s okay for some students to not be natural writers – but they should be taking full advantage of every resource possible to improve their skills, that’s part of what college is about.

Keep on writing! Share your writing tips with us in a comment below!

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