Tag Archives: parents

Crash Course Guide To Living At Home This Summer

Filed under: College Life, Social Life/Relationships, Tips - Angelina
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Cameron Tranchemontagne Blogger Biography

 

 

 

 

If you are like most college students, you are probably going to be living back home this summer and working at some temporary job to try to save up money for the next semester. Summer with your friends back home can be memorable, exciting, adventurous, and pure fun, but living at home also means you live under your parents’ roof. Clashes can naturally occur between your free spirit and you parents’ authority imposing rules and expectations. I have found that there are certain measures you can take to keep your cool and live harmoniously with your family when you head back home for college break.

1. Accept The Reality

You are not living in a dorm anymore. That means you have to clean up and do laundry on at least a regular schedule. By showing your parents that you are responsible, you may even impress them and have them allow you more liberties. Keeping tensions low by acting and behaving like the full functioning adult we all strive to become one day will earn you the respect of other adults. Save your desire to cut loose, relax, and have fun for nights and weekends.

Doing Laundry At Home With Parents

Photo © Amherst Bulletin

2. Balance Your Time

Don’t be a ghost in the house and only be home for when you need a place to sleep. Your family is just as important as your best friends and you should want to spend time with them. It is important to go out with your friends and practice a healthy social life, but just balance it. No college student has ever lasted a week at home without thinking to themselves, “Oh my god, I need to get out of this house!” So, I recommend dedicating three days out of the week to spending time with your family (playing games, eating dinner, attending family barbecues or reunions) and spending the rest of your free time either with your friends or doing something you find relaxing. Don’t be afraid to bring your friends around the house for some hybrid family-friend fun too.

College male with mom at home

Photo © UF CWC

3. Always Tell Your Parents Your Plans

Your family cares about you and wants to see you having fun while being safe and responsible at the same time. By telling your parents where you will be, what you will be doing, who you will be with, and when you will be back is a sure fire way to appease their concerns and allow you to participate in worry free fun. If plans change, let them know with a quick text or phone call. Not only is this a courtesy to your family, but it is also a smart safety tactic. If something were to happen, someone will know where you last were and how long it has been before you were supposed to come back. It’s better to be extra careful and to show your parents you are responsible enough without them having to nag you for your plans.

Talking With Parents About Curfew Plans

Photo © Teen Life

Although it may not be the easiest thing to move back home after living on your own, make the best of it. You will be heading back to campus before you know it and you will actually miss your family. How do you deal with adjusting back to home life?

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The Top 5 Things Every College Freshman Should Know

Filed under: College Life - BookRenter Team
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Like, don’t take “no” for an answer, don’t change yourself just to fit in, and – oh, yeah – call your parents.

by Guest Blogger Serena Piper / check out her last post on the coolest backpacks ever

We all know the traditional advice often doled out to those who are college-bound: take a tour of campus before school starts so you know where your classes will be; allow plenty of studying time so you aren’t pulling all-nighters before a big deadline; join a club or two; make new friends – the list goes on.

But when it comes to my own experience, this list leaves something to be desired. Here are the top five things I wish someone had told me before I started my freshman year.

1. Start off slowly. Some students think they absolutely have to start out their first year taking 16 credits or they’ll fall behind and not graduate on time. This is a myth. It’s perfectly okay to take fewer credits your first term. It gives you time to adjust to your new routine, get a feel for how things are done at the college level, and make some new friends. I suggest taking at least two classes just so you can see how you’ll manage your time, especially if you know you’ll have a part-time job or other commitments during the school year. But definitely don’t overwhelm yourself your first term.

by University of Innsbruck

2. Don’t take no for an answer. For example, if you don’t get into a class you want right away, talk to the professor, get on the waitlist, and find out when it will be offered again. Just because a class is full when you go to register for it doesn’t mean that’s the final word. Show that you’re interested because the more effort you put in, the more you’ll get back.

3. Rent your textbooks instead of buying them. Students generally buy their textbooks from the campus bookstore, but it’s often easier and definitely cheaper to rent your books (hello, BookRenter!). Paying big bucks for a book that I couldn’t sell back at the end of the term? Been there, done that, too many times – and I have a pile of textbooks I’ll never need again to show for it.

by Thai Nguyen

4. When it’s party time, keep your head on straight (and don’t let a future employer catch you out on Facebook). It may be a stereotype, but students like to party, and there can be a lot of pressure to drink in college. If you know drinking’s not for you, don’t waste your time trying to change yourself so that you fit in. There are plenty of other things to do on the weekends, like playing ultimate frisbee in the dark, taking a day trip to a nearby city, or doing an art project with your roommates. If you do like to drink when you go out, be safe. For example, many colleges offer a late-night campus shuttle service so that no one has to drive home drunk. Whether you drink when you go out or not, though, keep your head on straight. You don’t want a potential employer or grad school admissions officer to stumble on any crazy Facebook photos three or four years from now.

5. Call your parents. Yes, even if you aren’t homesick. Parents can give you a different perspective on things and remind you of where your focus should be. They know you in a way that no one else ever will, and when you’re away at school, this can be very comforting. Not only did I call my mom when I was homesick, but I also called her when I was feeling ill and needed some OJ, or when I wanted to know how long I should broil the acorn squash I was fixing for dinner. Just don’t let all their advice get to you. There are still times when I feel like I have to do what my mom or dad suggests, but later, when I do things my way, everything turns out just fine.

It’s normal to feel a little anxious about starting college. Take things one day at a time and give yourself time to adjust. Besides, whatever you don’t figure out beforehand, you’ll learn on your own, and someday it will make for a great story!

We value the diverse voices and fresh ideas that our guest bloggers bring to BookRenter.com. However, the ideas and opinions expressed in guest posts are strictly those of the post’s author and don’t necessarily reflect the ideas or opinions of BookRenter.Com. The information in guest posts is often drawn from a variety of sources, and we count on our guest authors to verify and fact-check the content they post. BookRenter.Com makes no claims, express or implied, as to the accuracy or completeness of guest post content or the suitability of the content for a specific purpose.

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So. You’re Living at Home This Summer.

Filed under: College Life - BookRenter Team
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Don’t chafe at having a few rules and regulations – benefits abound.

by Guest Blogger Keith Kaplan I ALBION COLLEGE: Brains (double-major honors student, Mortar Board, College Fellow) and brawn (swim team captain and an avid outdoorsman who most days can be seen paddling on the river that runs through his campus). Regular blogger. Co-founder of the eponymous DK Cookies (on Facebook!).

So, you’ve been back home from school this summer, have you? Back under your parents’ roof, in your old room? No matter how great your relationship with your parents is, it’s never easy to go from living on your own at school back to the scene of your growing up years, where on some level you’re still seen as needing close supervision and expected to abide by the house rules.

I have to admit that there are benefits to a temporary move back home (feel free to add to my list and share your own experiences).

by Robyn Lee

  • Home-cooked meals: Although it can be a struggle to cook for a family when everyone is fussy about what they eat, I do put my culinary skills to work fixing a meal now and then. But most nights I don’t actually have to shop for groceries or make a full dinner. My parents do it.
  • Laundry “service”: As much as we all love doing laundry…just kidding. My mom is nice enough to still do my laundry, even though I’ve been on my own for a few years now.
  • Friends who are back in town: When I came back home after graduation, it felt a little weird at first. But I found that a few old friends from high school were also back in town, and it’s been fun re-establishing those connections. Another plus: I have some place to go when my parents are driving me crazy (or the other way around).

There are also some potential challenges:

  • Striking a balance: I’ve been home for about two months, and it’s been tough getting used to how things go down in the house and finding a balance between the things I want to do – it’s my summer break, after all – and contributing to the life of the household (even the little things like loading and unloading the dishwasher, doing yard work, or washing the cars are appreciated).
  • Having a curfew: Depending on your parents, you might have a curfew. Even if you’re 21, remember that you’re living under your parents’ roof and need to live by their rules. Once you’ve been home awhile and established a routine, your ‘rents are likely to get more reasonable about when you need to be in at night, especially when they see how mature you’ve become (you are more mature now, right?).
  • Boredom: Chilling at home all day might sound good, but trust me, you’re going to get bored. If you don’t have a job, an internship, or some regularly scheduled activities, you’ll go crazy (I mean this in the least offensive way). Don’t let it happen! Make it a point to have a plan each day.

When you come back home, your parents need to realize that you’ve been off on your own for the past year, and your lifestyle is quite different. On the other hand, you need to realize that you’re not at college anymore. Come to a compromise on rules and activities that happen while you’re at home. It’s better to talk it out sooner than later because depending on your parents, they might still want to ground you.

We value the diverse voices and fresh ideas that our guest bloggers bring to BookRenter.com. However, the ideas and opinions expressed in guest posts are strictly those of the post’s author and don’t necessarily reflect the ideas or opinions of BookRenter.Com. The information in guest posts is often drawn from a variety of sources, and we count on our guest authors to verify and fact-check the content they post. BookRenter.Com makes no claims, express or implied, as to the accuracy or completeness of guest post content or the suitability of the content for a specific purpose.

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