Tag Archives: networking

The One Thing Missing From Your Resumé

Filed under: Volunteering and Giving Back - Social Community Manager
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photo of girlBy guest blogger Serena Piper
Journalism major at the University of Oregon. Editor-in-Chief of Her Campus Oregon. Magazine, freelance blogger, future world traveler. In her spare time, she likes to read as many books as she can, go for long drives, and peruse news websites. Hopes to one day write for National Geographic.

Stop what you’re doing and check your resumé.

Is there a section devoted to your volunteer experience? If not, maybe you should think twice about what you have planned for this summer. A lot of students hesitate to volunteer if it’s not required for school, a scholarship, or, heaven forbid, paying off a debt to society. But there’s something you should know: it’s not only personally rewarding, but it matters more to employers than you may think.

In my previous post about volunteering, I mentioned my experience at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Lane County, Oregon – and I can’t tell you how many opportunities I’ve snagged simply based off of this. Although listed at the bottom of my resumé, most employers have always asked about my experience at BBBS during the interview. BBBS has a lot of sponsors, so they have a ton of support what they do for at-risk youth. Keep in mind, this can be key to networking post-grad.

What volunteering says about you

Volunteering says that you are reliable and dedicated to showing up to the job even if it’s unpaid. Showing you care about your community says a lot about the type of person you are, so think about what you’re passionate about, and then find an organization that matches. Volunteerships are just like jobs: if you like what you’re doing, it doesn’t feel like work.

But volunteering is not all about what’s on your resume, either. I’ve made a lot of connections and friends I might not otherwise have made. Over the years, I’ve written numerous articles about BBBS, I’m constantly telling friends about volunteer opportunities, and I’ve even spoke to a room of 500 people at BBBS’ annual Fall breakfast about how mentoring has influenced my life.

If you’re feeling defeated and discouraged by how long it’s taking for you to complete your college degree, volunteering will give you immediate results every time you do it. If you volunteer at an animal shelter, you’ll see animals adopted every day; if you volunteer at a homeless shelter, you’ll dish out a meal the people you serve couldn’t be more grateful for.

In the end, volunteering isn’t just about donating your time. It’s about becoming a better person through generosity; giving your time to a person or place that could really use it, even though you have a million other things you could be doing. And it’s amazing how something seemingly so small can mean so much to someone else, but also be incredibly humbling.

 

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The Internship Hunt

Filed under: Post Grad and Career - BookRenter Team
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By guest blogger Tiana Bouma
Tiana is a senior at University of Oregon double majoring in Political Science and Journalism with a focus in magazine. Her hometown is now Bend, OR but she graduated from high school in Danville, CA. After graduating from UO, she plans on traveling and working for National Geographic. During her spare time, she enjoys music, reading, sports and movies.

Searching for internships has been the one of the most stressful parts of my college career. There are thousands I could apply for and only a few that would lead me to my dream job at National Geographic. So after dozens of advising meetings and searching hundreds of internship websites, I have amassed helpful tips for how to find the internship that suits your unique future goals. Getting the internship, however, is all on you.

Tip 1: Search online internship websites.

This may seem silly, and probably overdone, but I have stumbled on some interesting internships opportunities on websites. I have even found international internships in countries I’ve always wanted to visit that offer college credits.

Here are a few of my faves:

Internships.com: Offers general and regional internships, guides, and articles.
Usajobs.gov: An official U.S. government website with jobs for college students;
ie3global.ous.edu: Offers an array of global internships

Tip 2: Use your campus resources

Networking is a great way to find internships. Photo by hackNY

Career centers are there for a reason: to help you get jobs and internships. In addition, most colleges will have an internship page on their website.  Check on a regular basis because the site is always being updated with new opportunities. Certain majors may even have their own internship sites. Talk to professors. Don’t be afraid to ask; I have uncovered some hidden internship gems that way.

Tip 3: Talk to the company you want to work for

Let your dream company know you want to work for them! If it’s possible, visit the companies you are interested in and talk to different employees in the company. Find out what they like about the company and if they have ever had a need for an intern. If the idea of getting work for free makes them nervous, most colleges will provide internship credits. If it’s impossible to visit companies, then send them emails or take a few minutes to call and ask about internships and the necessary qualifications for an internship there.

Informational interviews another are a great way to introduce yourself to someone in the company. Find the position in the company that you aspire to have and call up that person. Tell them you would love to talk about how they got to where they are today because you hope to do the same. Who doesn’t love talking about themselves?!  (Remember: it’s not an interview of you, you are doing the interviewing. Come prepared with questions!)

Tip 4: Treating getting an internship like a job

This is the best advice I’ve gotten. You have to show companies that they are making a beneficial decision to their company. Display your talents and be a little pushy to convince potential employers that you are worth the time and manpower. Each internship can be a potential future job. When I interact with a company I am interested in, I write the date, company name, the name of the person I talked to, and what we talked about in a notebook. I also constantly add potential employers to a list. I usually follow-up with a company after my first call, even if they originally say no (you never know…things can change on a day -to-day basis!)

I hope some of these tips help. As daunting as the task may be, once you land the internship, you will realize that the hard word was worth it.

And hey, it’s not too early to start looking for the summer! Happy Hunting!

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