Tag Archives: job

Successful Tips For Starting A New Job

Filed under: College Life, Post Grad and Career, Tips - Angelina
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Sylwia Baran Blogger Biography

 

 

 

 

The only thing more nerve-wracking than a job interview is actually starting a new job. The new environment, new people, and new schedule can be enough to completely stress you out. Here are some tips on how to make the transition a bit smoother:

1. Give It A Fair Chance

Sometimes the first few days of a new job may seem scary and you may find yourself wanting to quit right off the bat. Don’t be too rash. Give the job at least two weeks before you make any permanent decisions. You may find that after you’ve gotten more familiar with the work and get into the swing of things, you’ll feel much differently about the job.

First Full-Time Job After College

Photo © CNN Living

2. Eat In

A great way to integrate yourself into a new company is to eat lunch in your job’s lunchroom. This way you can mingle with your co-workers in a more casual environment. Feeling more comfortable with the people you work with is a big part in feeling comfortable in your new job’s environment.

Work Cafeteria Lunchroom

Photo © Business Insider

3. Manage Your Time Wisely

This is especially important if you are starting a full-time job for the very first time. For those who have never worked full time before, it may take a while to get used to the long hours. However, as long as you learn to manage your time, you should make a smooth transition through this change. The important thing is to give yourself plenty of time in the morning to arrive at work at least 5 minutes early every day.

Managing Your Time At Work

Photo © YouQueen

4. Take Notes

The first few weeks of a new job can seem like a whirl wind. You are being taught all new things and having all sorts of information and procedures thrown at you. The best thing to do is to take notes. This way you can look back on them whenever you are unsure of something. It’s unrealistic to think that you’ll simply remember everything, believe me – you won’t.

Take Notes At Work

Photo © Incredible Vanishing Paper Weight

5. Ask Questions

One of the biggest misconceptions we have when we start a new job is that we shouldn’t ask too many questions. You may think that you’re being annoying, but I guarantee you that your new employer would much rather have you fully understand your assignment than you wasting time trying to guess how to do the work or to do it incorrectly.

Ask Questions At Work

Photo © SMUD

So, before you completely panic over starting a new job, take a breath, keep an open mind, and stay positive. Do you have any tips for starting a new job? Tell us in a comment below!

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4 Methods For Finding A Job

Filed under: College Life, Money/Budget, Post Grad and Career, Seasonal Celebrations, Tips - Angelina
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Angelina Bossone Blogger Biography

Congratulations to all you 2014 college graduates! And congrats to everyone else who has successfully completed another school year. If you haven’t already, the first thing you are going to want to do is relax and enjoy some time off before gearing up for another year. As understandable as this is, you might want to put relaxation to the side for just a minute and think about what you are planning to do for a summer job or how you are going to get money for the next semester.

1. Online

Try job searching online with websites such as www.monster.com, www.indeed.com, or www.simplyhired.com and search for jobs in your area or jobs that match your job interest. You could even just type your job interest into Google and all relevant positions should end up in the search result. Some places may require you to create an account to apply or to fill out an application online in addition to digitally submitting a resume and cover letter.

Online Job Searching

Photo © MBA Highway

2. Newspapers

Sometimes you can find job positions in your local newspaper. These may even be positions that might not end up online, so take a quick peak and see how you can apply. You might have to contact someone first to find out what they are looking for as a job application.

Newspaper Job Ads

Photo © the australian

3. In Person

If there is a place you go too often or somewhere that isn’t too far away? Stop in! Ask them in person if there are any open positions. It shows them you are making the extra effort and hopefully they will remember you when looking at your application as a step above the rest. If you come prepared with your resume, a cover letter (depending on the position you are applying for), references, and dressed appropriately – you will leave a lasting impression that tells them you are serious, prepared, and trustworthy.

Walk-In Job Search

Photo © Beyond Career Success

4. Recommendations

Jobs are highly competitive these days; especially for college students during the summer. It wouldn’t hurt to let everyone you know that you are job searching and what kind of a job you are searching for. Others may be aware of a particular job opening that they can recommend to you! At the least, they can keep a lookout to any potential job openings and let you know if they hear of anything.

College Female Getting Personal Job Recommendation

Photo © Express

Although you will want to have fun and relax during your break, you will also want some spending money now and for your upcoming semester. It also doesn’t hurt to get some job experience on your resume. And for graduates, don’t give up – you may not land your dream job right away and that is okay. Finding any kind of job is a major accomplishment!

Do you have any jobs lined up yet? If so, what? If not, then how do you plan to find one?

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Writing A Cover Letter

Filed under: Post Grad and Career, Tips - Angelina
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Loni Gibson Blogger Biography

 

 

 

 

We all know that a well-written resume could help get a hiring managers attention. However, cover letters are a crucial part of the hiring process too.

The best cover letters are specifically customized to the business and position you are applying to. Yes, this can be time-consuming, but it works to get your cover letter read and actually into the interview pile.

Here are some tips to make sure that your cover letter stands out:

1. Discuss Specific Details

Think of writing your cover letter as your personal sales pitch. You’re essentially selling yourself, your skills, and your knowledge to the company. Hiring managers are looking for details that show you’re familiar with the company and that you would make a good fit. Don’t think you have to go all out with these details. But by customizing your cover letter for each job description and making note of any industry-related news, new products, or recent announcements, it shows you’re paying attention.

Typing Cover Letter On Laptop Computer

Photo © ThirdAge

2. Show Your Success

Hiring managers want to know your past work experience that pertain to the job you’re applying for. Don’t just regurgitate your resume. Consider examples of times when your top skills had successful results and how that sets you apart for this particular job or internship.

Happy Female Job Success

Photo © Hundreds of Heads

3. Make It Look Good

This last detail is so simple, yet it’s often ignored. When writing a cover letter, never forget to proofread your work. If you are customizing each cover letter to every job description, it’s easy to miss some details here and there. But if a hiring manager sees an error, your cover letter will go straight into the “no” pile. The same goes for cover letters that aren’t written professionally. While creativity is great, keep your writing professional.

Cover Letter Example

Photo © MyBusinessProcess

When you finish writing your cover letter, send it off to a few friends or family members. Ask for their input to make sure it is the best it can be. If you send it electronically, make sure you save it as a PDF file instead of an editable document. That will give your cover letter the final touch!

 

What tips do you have on writing cover letters?

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Life After College: Now What?

Filed under: Post Grad and Career, Travel & Abroad, Volunteering and Giving Back - Social Community Manager
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Graduating from college is a huge accomplishment, and it’s even more wonderful if you have already secured a post-grad job… but what about those of us who haven’t? Your happy little moment of celebration can easily be soured with the reminder that you don’t have your foot in the job market yet, but rest assured, there are plenty of options for the unemployed undergrad.

peace corps

Photo © oar4me

Join the Peace Corps

Train for six months, serve for one to two years in another country with a monthly allowance, and get paid $7,500 for your work? Yes please! There are about nine different categories volunteer work falls under, from Education and Health to HIV/AIDS and Business. Connect with a recruiter in your area to find out more about the application process, but it’s best to start early if you want to be volunteering within six months. You might not get to pick which country you go to because it’s all based on the needs of what skills you have, but it’s a great opportunity to travel, make a difference in the world, and take a break from school to let the economy recover before you job search. Not to mention, it will look great on your resume! Side note: the other option is to do Americorps, which recruits volunteers to serve here in the U.S..

Teach English as foreign language (TEFL)

english as a foreign language

Photo © seetefl

Become certified to teach English in another country in as little as 4-6 weeks and all online! You may be able to find a program overseas that doesn’t require you to be

certified, but most employers look for people who are. With the TEFL certificate, you can teach in a variety of countries, such as Japan, Thailand, Indonesia, European countries, and South America. If you think you might want to teach, consider the very basic TEFL certificate. Even with the basic certificate, it’s a great resource to have if you want the means to live anywhere you wish. 

Just travel

map for travel

Photo © Cali4beach

A lot of people I’ve talked to seem to have one thing in common as far as what they regretted not doing after college: traveling. If you have long lost relatives overseas, take advantage of the connection and give them a call or send an email to catch up. Usually, families are more than welcoming when it comes to hosting. Since housing and food is already hooked up, all you’ll have to worry about is your round-trip plane ticket (assuming you want to come home!).

Still feeling stuck? It’s important to remember not to panic. You always have options; just put the time and research into seeing exactly what they are. The more research you do on your own, the better you’ll feel and the better choice you’ll make.

 

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What I Wish I Had Known Before I Started College

Filed under: College Life - BookRenter Team
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By guest blogger Serena Piper
Journalism major at the University of Oregon. Editor-in-Chief of Her Campus Oregon. Magazine, freelance blogger, future world traveler. In her spare time, she likes to read as many books as she can, go for long drives, and peruse news websites. Hopes to one day write for National Geographic.

Isn’t it unfortunate to find out at the end of your college career all the things you could’ve done differently to make the experience not only a better one, but also less painful post-grad? Then again, you probably wouldn’t be where you are now, and that’s hopefully a good place because, if you’re like me, you believe everything happens for a reason (even those tiny, yet crucial lessons you learned in college).

As my senior year comes to an end in just a few short terms, I’ve been reflecting on what I’ve learned these past four years. Everyone’s college experience is different and we each take away something different, but there are always at least a few things we can share with each other that will help others be better prepared. Like not spending your entire financial refund in one week on a new video game console or a new wardrobe and remembering to wear flip-flops in the dorm showers. But it’s 2012 now and while some cautions stay the same, there are some different things I wish I’d known before I started my college career…

1. No college student eats only Top Ramen.

You will not solely be eating instant noodles in college. Photo by brownpau.

When I look back, it seems like this was just a scary story told to all freshly graduated high school students. “Make sure you’re stocked up on Top Ramen, because you won’t be doing a lot of cooking” was a phrase I heard repeatedly. And we all know that when you’re told something repeatedly, you start to believe it. Thank goodness I was proved wrong. The college budget may be tight, but it’s not that tight. Soup is just as cheap as Top Ramen (not to mention more flavorful and healthy), and lucky for us Tech Century babies, there are now websites, such as MyFridgeFood or SuperCook, that will suggest meals based on the ingredients you already have in your fridge and/or cupboards.

2. Travel lightly.

You may have to move locations a few times in college and the less stuff you have to have your dad help you with, the better. “How much more stuff do you have?” my dad would ask me after each trip to and from the moving truck. His words echoed in my ears when I arrived at my new place, exhausted but knowing I still needed to unpack if I wanted any space to maneuver in my new room. That’s when I realized I needed to downsize. One tip I’ve learned from Real Simple Magazine that has stuck with me: instead of keeping those old 4th grade basketball team photos and trophies, take a picture of them! This way you can keep the items digitally, but not have to cart them around.

3. A part-time job is a blessing in disguise.

This is America, so yes, you have a right to complain, but jobs are more than work and if you think you won’t have time for one, you’ll make time. Benefits: You get out of the dorms, you make some money, and you’re learning things your unemployed friends aren’t.  Even if you don’t like your job or wish you were doing something else, think of it this way: you’re learning skills you may use in the future. Plus, depending on your job, there may be some health benefits, as well, and you’ll be equipped with letters of rec when you graduate. Can your friends say the same thing?

4. Don’t even think about rooming with a high school friend.

Ok, some people can hack it, but there is a very high chance of losing said friendship the moment you move in together and he/she informs you their significant other will be staying the night every couple of days. Disagreements will turn into walking around on eggshells, and it’ll feel exactly like high school all over again. The last thing anyone starting college needs is more drama so if you want to play it safe, room with someone new. Plus hopefully you’ll end up with a new friend!

5. You probably won’t graduate in four years.

It may take you longer than 4 years to graduate. Photo by University of Denver.

When you graduate depends not just on your major, but also how many credits you take each term. Sadly, even if you do attend school full-time each term, you still probably won’t make it in four years. If you want to graduate in as little time as possible, meet with an adviser each term to make sure you are registering for classes that will apply to your degree. If it turns out you’ll be taking classes longer than you had wanted, look at it this way: you have more time to search for that post-grad job and (hopefully) save a little money before being out in “the real world.” Not to mention, you’ll have more time to defer those loan payments. By the time you graduate, maybe there will be a law forgiving student debt! Hey, I can dream, can’t I?

My number one piece of advice? Talk to as many people as you can before beginning college just so you know what you’re up against. College has its fun moments, yes, but they’re even more enjoyable when you’re prepared for anything that is thrown your way.

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