Tag Archives: greek life

5 Reasons to Rush Into It!

Filed under: College Life, Social Life/Relationships, Tips - Angelina
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Crystal Keefe Blogger Biography

 

 

 

 

The start of Spring semester here at University of Delaware (UD) means the start of Sorority Recruitment! This is true at a lot of other colleges too! Many people have a tough time deciding whether or not they want to rush, so I’m going to give you the top 5 reasons of why you should consider it!

Greek Sorority Alpha Delta Pi

Photo © fsc.mocs

1. Rush is an intense 2 week period that ends with you gaining hundreds (literally) of new friends and allows you to broaden your network.

2. If you are a freshman (or a transfer student like I was), this is a great way to get yourself out there and get more involved on campus.

3. It looks GREAT on your resume!

4. You have the opportunity to take on leadership roles.

5. Awesome weekend retreats and mixers (social events),

Group of College Girls at the Greek Games

Photo © FSU Student & Community Involvement

I transferred to UD after my freshman year and knew immediately I wanted to rush.  Joining a sorority ended up being the best decision I have made since being at college, and I absolutely love it.  It makes this school truly feel like a home away from home.

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What It Means to be Greek

Filed under: College Life - BookRenter Team
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By BookRenter Corporate Communications Intern, Rachel Freeman
Rachel is a graduate student at San Francisco State. She received her Bachelor’s in Communication from University of the Pacific. In addition to working at BookRenter, she coaches high school and club volleyball. In her spare time, you can find her playing with her golden retriever, Mollie, and cheering on her hometown San Francisco Giants.

This blog post is the second about Greek Life in college. Click here to read part 1. 

by Wikipedia

There are 400,000 active members in Greek organizations nationwide. And many of these organizations are gearing up for spring recruitment (formally known as rush). But what does it mean to go Greek and be Greek?

We’ve all seen the TV shows and movies. Legally Blonde, Sydney White, Animal House, Greek. What do they all have in common? They depict college Greek life. But when there are no actors and no cameras, Greek life is not exactly what Hollywood shows us it is.

Being Greek means being part of a community that exists not only on your college campus but all around the country. Being Greek means being involved in philanthropy projects and community service. Being Greek means being held accountable to higher academic standards, as determined by minimum GPAs. Being Greek means living and experiencing college with your best friends.

Here are some pretty neat facts about the Greek community (thanks, East Carolina University!):

  • All but two of the US presidents, since 1825 have been Greek
  • All but two of the US vice presidents, since 1825 have been Greek
  • 30% of US Congressmen/women are Greek
  • 42% of US Senators are Greek
  • 40% of all Supreme Court Justices have been Greek
  • 30% of Fortune 500 Executives are Greek
  • 71% of Greeks graduate college, while only about 50% of non-Greeks do
  • All of the Apollo 11 astronauts were Greek
  • Greeks make up only 2% of the US Population

by Steph Nester

Furthermore, Greeks give back – both to charity and to their universities – once they have graduated and moved on. Greek alumni give approximately 75% of all money donated to universities. Undergraduate collegiate members raised about $7 million per year for charities and give around 850,000 volunteer hours per year.

Delta Delta Delta sorority recently donated $10 million to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Pi Kappa Phi fraternity has had over 1,500 members participate in the bicycle treks of the Journey of Hope and Gear Up Florida and the construction event, Build America.

Going Greek is not for everyone, but for people who do join it can be a life-changing experience. Who knows, yours bridesmaids may be your sorority sisters or the next President of the United States could be your fraternity brother!

Are you Greek? What does it mean to you?

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Going Greek – Is it right for you?

Filed under: College Life - BookRenter Team
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By guest blogger Tiana Bouma
Tiana is a senior at University of Oregon double majoring in Political Science and Journalism with a focus in magazine. Her hometown is now Bend, OR but she graduated from high school in Danville, CA. After graduating from UO, she plans on traveling and working for National Geographic. During her spare time, she enjoys music, reading, sports and movies.

This blog post is the first in a series of posts about Greek Life in college. Click here for part 2.

For many incoming freshman, fraternity and sorority life is synonymous with the college experience. Yet, entering that commitment can bring about a lot of questions.

As a founding member of a sorority on my University of Oregon campus, I have had a unique experience in the Greek system.  I love the experience I am having and I found an amazing community that fits me. Community is the most important aspect to me.

Being a member of the Greek system requires a feel of comfort and ease at the chapter you choose during recruitment. If there is no chapter that appeals to you, then do not force a choice because it will not be the right decision.

by Murray State

If you make the decision to rush, then congratulations, it is a bond that cannot be easily replaced. Do not enter rush with a certain chapter in mind. As much as we may want to be a legacy (a brother/sister, son/daughter, grandson/granddaughter or nephew/niece of a specific member of a Greek organization), what fits for our parents or siblings may not fit for us.

Moving to college and going through recruitment in the first few weeks of school is stressful but remember you are not alone. Remember that everyone going through recruitment is undulated by the college lifestyle and the gaggle of  people as well.

by Greek@Duke

Here are a few tips that about going Greek:

  • Be yourself – It sounds cliché but the men and women you are meeting need to see the real you.
  • Don’t try to force a fit – If it doesn’t feel right, it probably isn’t. Go with your gut and you will find the chapter that is right for you
  • Talk about life and goals – Talking about your goals and life plans will help you make connections with members of the chapter. If you click on those deep-level items, you are bound to get along.
  • Be prepared to put work into the relationships – Being a member of the Greek community takes work just like being a member of any community does. Don’t expect everything to come to you. There is a saying, “You get out of it what you put into it.”
  • Don’t let your decision be swayed by others – Make sure you are making the decision you want to make. Outside influencers don’t necessarily know what you are feeling and may be tempted to sway you one way or the other for their own reasons.
  • Don’t be nervous or scared, you will know when the fit is right

Entering the Greek system is a great experience. I wish you luck if you choose to go through recruitment and when you join a chapter, remember to wear your letters proudly!

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