Tag Archives: community

Going Greek – Is it right for you?

Filed under: College Life - BookRenter Team
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By guest blogger Tiana Bouma
Tiana is a senior at University of Oregon double majoring in Political Science and Journalism with a focus in magazine. Her hometown is now Bend, OR but she graduated from high school in Danville, CA. After graduating from UO, she plans on traveling and working for National Geographic. During her spare time, she enjoys music, reading, sports and movies.

This blog post is the first in a series of posts about Greek Life in college. Click here for part 2.

For many incoming freshman, fraternity and sorority life is synonymous with the college experience. Yet, entering that commitment can bring about a lot of questions.

As a founding member of a sorority on my University of Oregon campus, I have had a unique experience in the Greek system.  I love the experience I am having and I found an amazing community that fits me. Community is the most important aspect to me.

Being a member of the Greek system requires a feel of comfort and ease at the chapter you choose during recruitment. If there is no chapter that appeals to you, then do not force a choice because it will not be the right decision.

by Murray State

If you make the decision to rush, then congratulations, it is a bond that cannot be easily replaced. Do not enter rush with a certain chapter in mind. As much as we may want to be a legacy (a brother/sister, son/daughter, grandson/granddaughter or nephew/niece of a specific member of a Greek organization), what fits for our parents or siblings may not fit for us.

Moving to college and going through recruitment in the first few weeks of school is stressful but remember you are not alone. Remember that everyone going through recruitment is undulated by the college lifestyle and the gaggle of  people as well.

by Greek@Duke

Here are a few tips that about going Greek:

  • Be yourself – It sounds cliché but the men and women you are meeting need to see the real you.
  • Don’t try to force a fit – If it doesn’t feel right, it probably isn’t. Go with your gut and you will find the chapter that is right for you
  • Talk about life and goals – Talking about your goals and life plans will help you make connections with members of the chapter. If you click on those deep-level items, you are bound to get along.
  • Be prepared to put work into the relationships – Being a member of the Greek community takes work just like being a member of any community does. Don’t expect everything to come to you. There is a saying, “You get out of it what you put into it.”
  • Don’t let your decision be swayed by others – Make sure you are making the decision you want to make. Outside influencers don’t necessarily know what you are feeling and may be tempted to sway you one way or the other for their own reasons.
  • Don’t be nervous or scared, you will know when the fit is right

Entering the Greek system is a great experience. I wish you luck if you choose to go through recruitment and when you join a chapter, remember to wear your letters proudly!

We value the diverse voices and fresh ideas that our guest bloggers bring to BookRenter. However, the ideas and opinions expressed in guest posts are strictly those of the post’s author and don’t necessarily reflect the ideas or opinions of BookRenter. The information in guest posts is often drawn from a variety of sources, and we count on our guest authors to verify and fact-check the content they post. BookRenter  makes no claims, express or implied, as to the accuracy or completeness of guest post content or the suitability of the content for a specific purpose.
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My Top 5 Reasons Why You Need a Bike

Filed under: Health & Fitness - BookRenter Team
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Oh, and if you happen to have a cool new bike like mine, you get to show it off.

by Guest Blogger Keith Kaplan I ALBION COLLEGE: Brains (double-major honors student, Mortar Board, College Fellow) and brawn (swim team captain and an avid outdoorsman who most days can be seen paddling on the river that runs through his campus). Regular blogger. Co-founder of the eponymous DK Cookies (on Facebook!).

1. Biking is good for you.

Biking is one of the healthiest workouts around. Not only do you burn calories and strengthen your lower body, but it’s a low-impact exercise that’s safe for almost everyone – you don’t need to be a professional to ride a bike. Biking is a faster way to travel, too. Whether you’re running late for an early class across campus or for work, you can hop on your bike and get there in at least half the time it would’ve taken you to walk.

2. Biking is good for your community.

Riding a bike you’re delivering benefits to everyone around you. For example, you help reduce your community’s carbon footprint by cutting down on air pollution and reducing water pollution (less brake fluid, anti-freeze, and transmission fluid to flow from storm drain to sea). You contribute to a more serene environment by reducing noise pollution. And leaving your car at home means an extra parking space for others to use.

by Eric Richardson

3. Biking is convenient.

Have you ever lived in, or traveled to, a large city? Well, I have, and I can tell you that it was a pain to find a parking spot. (See #2 above.) Then when I did find one, I wasn’t allowed to park there. So I threw down $40 for a parking garage for the day. My point being that having a bike to use in the city is much more convenient than parking and will save you time and money besides.

4. Biking is something you can do with old friends.

Do you find yourself sitting around with your friends saying, “What should we do?” and everyone responds, “I don’t know, what is there to do?” Go for a bike ride! It could be as simple as a trip into town or something more ambitious, like a ride on a local trail. You’re engaging in healthy outdoor activity and spending quality time with friends at the same time – doesn’t get any better than that.

5. You can meet new friends when you’re on a bike.

When you’re on a bike and come to a stop sign or a fork in the road, chances are that a fellow cyclist is close by. I can practically guarantee you that a conversation – and possibly a new friendship – will ensue. Something else that I didn’t realize until this weekend when I bought a new bike is that in many towns, including mine, there’s a large presence of cycling groups. It got me thinking: What a great way to meet new people. I think I might even join one.

One last unofficial reason why you need a bicycle: When you get one, you get to show it off.  Check out mine:

by Keith Kaplan

We value the diverse voices and fresh ideas that our guest bloggers bring to BookRenter.com. However, the ideas and opinions expressed in guest posts are strictly those of the post’s author and don’t necessarily reflect the ideas or opinions of BookRenter.Com. The information in guest posts is often drawn from a variety of sources, and we count on our guest authors to verify and fact-check the content they post. BookRenter.Com makes no claims, express or implied, as to the accuracy or completeness of guest post content or the suitability of the content for a specific purpose.

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