Tag Archives: College

Spring Time!

Filed under: College Life, Seasonal Celebrations - Angelina
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Crystal Keefe Blogger Biography

 

 

 

 

Spring season has finally started and the graduation countdown has begun!

Shout-Out To High School Students:

This is the perfect time to be visiting the campuses of schools you may be going to next fall or to start exploring potential future schools. The spring is definitely the prettiest time for almost every school.  Piece of advice, if you visit the University of Delaware, try to avoid coming on a Tuesday because it ALWAYS rains on Tuesdays.  Any other day of the week you should be able to see the campus in all its glory with tree lined walkways, cobble stone paths, historic buildings, and great places to eat on Main Street.

Cherry Blossom Flower Plant at the University of Delaware in the Spring

Photo © City-Data

Shout-Out To College Students:

Feel free to start doing some reading or homework out on the lawn or at a table outside. Enjoy the sun and use the nice weather as a form of stress relief as the end of the year becomes a little hectic.

And college seniors, take this time to truly enjoy and soak in your college campus.  Lie out on the green, take a walk down Main Street, and convince your friends to do a celebratory bar crawl. Graduation is right around the corner, so take the time now to cherish these last moments of being a college student and make some unforgettable memories.

Male College Student Reading Outside By A Tree In The Spring

Photo © Nick in exsilio

Happy Spring! What is your favorite Spring-time activity?

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Choosing A College: Urban Or Rural?

Filed under: College Life, Education, Tips - Angelina
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Serena Piper Blogger Biography

 

 

 

 

In my last blog post, I talked about how to choose a college in the East or West coast. If you have got that down, now it’s time to start thinking by scale: urban or rural?

First, just to clarify, urban means areas with a high population density (50,000 or more), such as Chicago, Los Angeles, Washington D.C., or Philadelphia. Rural means anything outside of what would be called a city; the smaller towns.

From the time we’re little, we usually know which we prefer: a bustling city full of life and commotion, or a quiet, wide open space with room to breathe. Our parents usually decide where we live, though, and some of us never have the opportunity to travel and experience a different type of living. Determining the type of environment you want to live in is as important as determining which study method works for you. If you’re unhappy, it can affect your grades, and eventually career and internship opportunities.

So, before you decide on a college, consider these factors that go beyond the school itself:

1. Transportation

If you don’t have a car, public transportation may be necessary. Check to see what the school has to offer and how far things are for walking distance.

Bus Stop Transportation

Photo © Seattle Municipal Archives

2. Entertainment

When you live in the country, a trip into the city is just that, a trip. Museums, shopping, and concerts are all typically in the city. Entertainment can be harder (but not impossible) to find in a rural area.

Shopping Boutique Stores

Photo © dawn.v

3. Hobbies

You’ll find a huge range of outdoor activities in rural settings. Some smaller towns have a great sense of community involvement, which can be a comforting feeling, especially if you’re far from actual family.

Outdoor Basketball Hobby

Photo © mydogbeasley

4. Privacy and Safety

In the city, apartment windows often directly face another apartment’s windows. There’s no “view,” and consequently, no sense of privacy. Cities do also tend to have higher crime levels.

City Apartment Window View

Photo © Franki47

5. Internships

Most internships and jobs are in the city. It’s a trade-off; while you may not be able to have both the country life and a great internship, you can rest easy knowing you’ll be able to pick and choose later.

Girl in City Office Internship

Photo © Internshipeurope

It might be a good idea to make a list of what’s important to you in your choice of colleges. If you can, try to visit the area you’re considering before making the actual move.

Good luck!

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Choosing A College: East or West Coast?

Filed under: College Life, Education, Tips - Angelina
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Serena Piper Blogger Biography

 

 

 

 

It’s one of the biggest decisions you’ll make in your life: where to go to college. A lot of students-to-be simply choose the one conveniently located in their town, or at least in their state, to avoid out-of-state tuition costs, which can be pretty steep. However, if you’re considering attending a college outside of your state, there are several things you should keep in mind.

1. Cost

This is usually a big factor in the college decision, but don’t let the expense be the only factor. Remember, there are loans, grants, and scholarships available. Apply, apply, apply, and then, based on which types of aid you are offered, make your decision. Include transportation in costs too. Will you have to drive everywhere or is public transportation an option?

Money in a bag college costs

Photo © 401(K) 2013

2. Family

Is being close to your family important to you? If you tend to get homesick easily, consider choosing a college somewhat close to home. Some students like being able to drive home on the weekend, or being able to attend family gatherings.

Family Group Portrait

Photo © Gerry Slabaugh

3. Location

A lot of people would argue that people are friendlier on the West Coast than they are on the East Coast. The East Coast is generally stereotyped as being stuck up and for the “rich kids,” while the West Coast is stereotyped as almost too laid back. If you like to spend your time outdoors, a West Coast college is perfect for you with more wide-open spaces for more outdoor activities. Recreation on the East Coast usually means city activities.

United States Map of Locations

Photo © NASA Earth Observatory

4. Weather

For those wanting four seasons, consider a college in New England. Like the laid-back, comfortable climate? Consider down south. Also, there tend to be less serious natural disasters on the West Coast.

Weather Conditions Outside

Photo © DrVassilis

5. Safety

There is going to be crime anywhere you live, but some areas have a lower level of it. Also, some colleges are more on top of campus security than others. If that’s important to you, make sure to research it.

Campus Police Safety

Photo © hectorir

If possible, try to visit the colleges you’re considering before making a decision. Also, to save money, consider community college for the first two years and then transferring to a university. There are great colleges everywhere – spend the time finding the one that best fits your major, your budget, and your lifestyle.

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Major Problems

Filed under: College Life, Education, Post Grad and Career, Tips - Angelina
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Sylwia Baran Blogger Biography

 

 

 

 

One of the biggest stress factors of a college student that is deciding on a major. If you are one of the few lucky people who enter college your freshmen year with a clear idea of what you want to do for the rest of your life, then you are incredibly fortunate and this does not apply to you. However, the majority of us will change our minds at least a dozen times before we actually choose one definite major.

1. Don’t Panic

The first thing you need to do is realize that you are not alone! Most people don’t have everything figured out their freshmen year; most of us are still deliberating on our majors as sophomores, juniors and some even as seniors. So, don’t stress yourself out and go crazy just because you don’t have everything figured out yet.

Overwhelmed College Student

Photo © casalewebnet2

2. Variety of Classes

Even if you have an idea of what you’d like to major in, it’s a very good idea to take a wide range of courses before making a concrete decision. So even if you’re a business major, take an art history or media studies course; you’ll never know what works for you until you explore different options. The more variety of courses you take, the more it will help in making the right decision.

Stack of Subject Class Books

Photo © LollyKnit

3. Research Careers

When you have a major in mind, research what types of careers and positions you can go into with that major. Then, consider if any of these careers are something you could see yourself doing in the future. Or, research a type of career you are interested in and see what major would be needed for that position.

Woman Searching Internet for Career and Job Research

Photo © jobs23116

4. Your Interests

You don’t want to be stuck doing a job for the rest of your life that you have no interest in. When deciding on a major, consider your interests and what you’d enjoy doing. Work doesn’t seem like work if you enjoy what you do.

Girl showing off her portfolio of design

Photo © VCAD.ca

So don’t let this stress you out. Simply take the time to explore different majors as well as your interests and eventually you will come to a decision. Don’t create limiting time constraints for choosing a major because they may cause you to panic and not make an informed decision. And remember, you can always change your major if you change your mind, even if you have declared it!

 

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Twitter for Post-Grad

Filed under: All Things Tech, College Life, Post Grad and Career, Tips - Angelina
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Serena Piper Blogger Biography

 

 

 

 

Twitter has more than 200 million active users, so it’s safe to say some of that 200 million are employers looking to hire your highly qualified and educated self. For those of you who don’t have a Twitter account, get one. Like Facebook, it’s addicting, but unlike Facebook, it’s a bridge to employers, job opportunities, and beneficial connections. Jobvite’s 2012 Social Recruiting Survey found that “more than half (54 percent) of recruiters now use Twitter for their talent search.” It’s become an essential tool for both employers and job seekers (like college students), so get on board! Here are a few accounts to follow to get started.

1. @JobHuntOrg

Jobs, advice, and resources. Just looking over their feed, there are a lot of helpful articles, including knowing when to relocate for a job, mistakes to avoid at job interviews, and how to stand out from other job seekers.

2. @InternQueen

As I mentioned in my last post, Lauren Berger is the goto expert on finding and keeping internships, not to mention other career and workplace advice.

3. @AskAManager

“Not sure what your manager is thinking, how to ask for a raise, whether you might be in danger of getting fired, or more? Ask away.” Insight that’ll prove to be valuable. Also check out @BrazenCareerist.

4. @Ed2010

For those journalism majors who want the latest on openings in the magazine world.

5. @Lifehacker

Okay, not really job related, but still – simple tips and tricks everyone can benefit from.

6. @CollegeTownLife

“Articles, photos, videos, music & everything college.”

Twitter Website Page

Photo © shareski

Other accounts to follow: your professors and university, people who work in your field of study, companies you’re interested in, etc. Build up your own following, market yourself via your profile, etc. Put yourself out there and reach out to people and companies. You never know what you’ll find.

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