Tag Archives: classes

5 Classes That Should Be Offered in College

Filed under: College Life, Education - BookRenter Team
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By guest blogger Serena Piper
Journalism major at the University of Oregon. Editor-in-Chief of Her Campus Oregon. Magazine, freelance blogger, future world traveler. In her spare time, she likes to read as many books as she can, go for long drives, and peruse news websites. Hopes to one day write for National Geographic.

When registering for new classes each term, do you ever come up with a list of classes you wish were offered? I know I wish my college offered Egyptology. I’ve spent the past week talking with a bunch of people about the classes they wish they could take at school. A lot of them were caught off guard by the question, but let’s face it: in between math problems, English essays, and our jobs, we don’t really have a lot of time to daydream about better and more interesting classes. It was interesting to me to hear what my friends would like to take a class on. They were great ideas and, who would’ve thought, classes I would enjoy too!

Here’s what people told me they’d like to learn about in college:

How to Catch Some Zzz’s
“A class that would teach me how to actually get eight hours of sleep each night would be so worth it,” sophomore Carly Davy said. “And if I actually got to sleep during the class, even better!”

Get Organized
Leave it to the girls to speak up about a class that teaches organizational skills. Of course, this might come in handy for the guys, too! “I would want someone to teach me how to organize my closet and my dresser so that it doesn’t look as cluttered,” Alandra Bailey said. Bailey says Pinterest has been her only inspiration to try and organize it herself. Hey, if HGTV makes money off teaching us how to organize our homes, why can’t colleges?

Fashion Trends
One student said they’d like to study fashion trends and why exactly they are a trend. In the February issue of Real Simple Magazine, one article talked about how geometric shapes is a popular trend on the runways right now. I’m all about dressing fashionably, but I don’t think anyone likes math enough to wear it! Maybe this class would teach us the dos and dont’s of fashion? Like What Not to Wear, classroom version.

Pick a country, any country. Photo by David Holt.

Pick a Country, Any Country
“I would like to take a class that assigns each student a country to study the entire term,” junior Megan Bauer said. Now this would be one fun way for the world to learn about other countries, not to mention completely easy! Who says physical fitness classes have to be the only easy classes?

The Art of Seduction!
Americans aren’t the only ones who would be lined up to take this class.  “I think that seducing people is part of our lives, and it’s nice to be the one getting seduced,” says Pelayo Perez, a junior from Gijon, Spain. College isn’t just a time to be “serious” about your future; it’s also a time to explore your interests, as far as they may reach. I wonder how many people would enroll in a class that teaches the basics of seducing someone?

What would you like to take a class on? As always, the sky is the limit!

And check out Online College’s list of the 15 Strangest College Courses in America.

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How Seniors Can Enjoy Their Last Semester of College

Filed under: College Life - BookRenter Team
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By BookRenter IT Intern Jason Kuang
Jason is a senior at San Jose State University majoring in Business Administration with a concentration in Management Information Systems. Loves science and technology, music and camping in the wilderness. Currently searching for the ultimate meaning of life through various philosophical views. Has lots of interests but not sure there is enough time in the world to pursue all of them.

by Amy Fleming

The fall semester is coming to an end in a few weeks. It is about this time that seniors really have to start thinking about what classes they need to take and even (dare I say) life after college. Yes! That’s right. The time-consuming, dreadful task of enrolling in classes is not a spontaneous activity. You have to sit down and really focus on how to balance classes, work and family, making sure they all piece together in your schedule smoothly. On top of that, now you have to figure out what you want to do after you graduate! That’s a lot to think about.

Sigh no more! Relax and take a deep breath. Truth be told, with only one semester to go, everything is happening all at once. Gearing up for the next chapter of our lives after four years of living in the “college bubble” can be a little daunting and overwhelming. I don’t know about you though, but I am ready to bring this change into my life!

Here are some tips to help you make the most of your final semester:

  1. Take a course you’ve always thought about taking but haven’t yet – Enroll in that course you’ve always wanted to take. Many universities offer classes like wine appreciation, photography, and even archery. Use your last semester to experience something different. Who knows? You might end up liking it and making a new hobby out of it.
  2. It is never too late to join a club and meet new people – Don’t just stay at home, coasting through your last semester. Get involved in a club or cause that is important to you. Remember, the network of people that you meet in college may go a long way once you are in the real world.
  3. Never let yourself slow down – Just because next semester is the last, don’t let that be a reason to slack off. Exams and projects are still important, especially if you are planning to go to graduate school (either immediately after college or after a few years off). Don’t let that GPA fall now that you’ve gotten so close to the finish line. Plan well and finish strong!

by inktastic

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Studying Alone vs. Studying in Groups

Filed under: College Life - BookRenter Team
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by Guest Blogger Laura H.

Studying alone and studying in a group both have their advantages and disadvantages. But what are the pros and cons of each?

The biggest downside to studying alone is that, well, you’re alone. A huge advantage of studying in a group is there are people around to push you through bouts of boredom or lack of inspiration when writing essays. Groups can also help you through particularly long nights of studying. If I know I have to study for more than 3 hours on one paper or test, I usually prefer to study in a group. That way, I am  able to ask those my classmates for help if I need it.

When studying, one should take at least a 5 or 10 minute break every hour. Use this time to stretch, watch a funny video on YouTube or go on a walk. It may be tempting to skip the study break and work for hours on end, but the small break every hour enables you to maintain purposeful focus for longer periods of time. Physically, your body needs a break as well; your brain will retain clarity with the break from the computer screen, and your back won’t tighten up from hours in the chair.

by Steven S.

While sitting with others can be helpful, studying alone is more advantageous when you have a very specific, deliberate task ahead of you and can’t afford to be interrupted. If, for example, you have a reading quiz in your 8 a.m. class and it’s 10 pm the night before, studying alone can help you focus on what you are reading..

Overall, the homework assignment or project may dictate with whom you work. It’s up to you to decide what’s best for your particular situation.

We value the diverse voices and fresh ideas that our guest bloggers bring to BookRenter. However, the ideas and opinions expressed in guest posts are strictly those of the post’s author and don’t necessarily reflect the ideas or opinions of BookRenter. The information in guest posts is often drawn from a variety of sources, and we count on our guest authors to verify and fact-check the content they post. BookRenter  makes no claims, express or implied, as to the accuracy or completeness of guest post content or the suitability of the content for a specific purpose.
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Acing the First Day of School

Filed under: College Life - BookRenter Team
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Say goodbye to those first day jitters

by Guest Blogger Kelsey Bradshaw

The first day of school is one of the best days of the entire school year. You get to catch up with friends, and most of the actual school part is just going over the syllabus.

However, this day carries a lot of responsibility along with its festivities. It’s the day for you to make a great first impression on potential new friends and even teachers. So how do you prepare for this day of total and complete judgment from everyone you meet? No pressure…

Between enjoying the last of summer and getting your beauty sleep, check online to see if any of your professors have posted a syllabus yet. It’s always a good idea to read over them ahead of time to get a general idea of what the class is going to be like, or to see if you have any assignments or need special materials on the first day of class. Once you have your reading list, get shopping! The week classes start, the bookstores will be overflowing with stressed-out students scrambling to get their book shopping done at the last minute. Don’t be one of them – shop and rent your textbooks ASAP!

by MyTudut

Now that you’ve read your syllabus and rented your books, it’s time to buy the basic school supplies like pencils, pens, and notebooks. Pack these in your bag the night before to avoid them being forgotten in the morning. One time, I was so worried about what I was going to wear that I completely spaced bringing any form of writing utensil to class–which wouldn’t have been so bad, except it was to a writing class. Oops.

Once you actually make it to class, sit by people that look friendly and strike up a conversation before class begins (because you’re early like a good student, right?!). Even if you’re not nearly caffeinated enough to deal with being back at school again, just fake your confidence until it’s real. Smile lots, act like you’re everybody’s best friend, and be a model student who totallllly didn’t forget to do the summer reading. And don’t forget to raise your hand at least once, especially in huge lecture hall classes, so you’ll be more memorable and stick out a little from the masses.

Last of all, remember that it’s only the first day, and while first impressions are important, they’re not permanent. You’ll have the rest of the semester to hit it off with your new classmates, so just relax and enjoy being back at school.

Good luck on your first day!

We value the diverse voices and fresh ideas that our guest bloggers bring to BookRenter.com. However, the ideas and opinions expressed in guest posts are strictly those of the post’s author and don’t necessarily reflect the ideas or opinions of BookRenter.Com. The information in guest posts is often drawn from a variety of sources, and we count on our guest authors to verify and fact-check the content they post. BookRenter.Com makes no claims, express or implied, as to the accuracy or completeness of guest post content or the suitability of the content for a specific purpose.

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The Top 5 Things Every College Freshman Should Know

Filed under: College Life - BookRenter Team
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Like, don’t take “no” for an answer, don’t change yourself just to fit in, and – oh, yeah – call your parents.

by Guest Blogger Serena Piper / check out her last post on the coolest backpacks ever

We all know the traditional advice often doled out to those who are college-bound: take a tour of campus before school starts so you know where your classes will be; allow plenty of studying time so you aren’t pulling all-nighters before a big deadline; join a club or two; make new friends – the list goes on.

But when it comes to my own experience, this list leaves something to be desired. Here are the top five things I wish someone had told me before I started my freshman year.

1. Start off slowly. Some students think they absolutely have to start out their first year taking 16 credits or they’ll fall behind and not graduate on time. This is a myth. It’s perfectly okay to take fewer credits your first term. It gives you time to adjust to your new routine, get a feel for how things are done at the college level, and make some new friends. I suggest taking at least two classes just so you can see how you’ll manage your time, especially if you know you’ll have a part-time job or other commitments during the school year. But definitely don’t overwhelm yourself your first term.

by University of Innsbruck

2. Don’t take no for an answer. For example, if you don’t get into a class you want right away, talk to the professor, get on the waitlist, and find out when it will be offered again. Just because a class is full when you go to register for it doesn’t mean that’s the final word. Show that you’re interested because the more effort you put in, the more you’ll get back.

3. Rent your textbooks instead of buying them. Students generally buy their textbooks from the campus bookstore, but it’s often easier and definitely cheaper to rent your books (hello, BookRenter!). Paying big bucks for a book that I couldn’t sell back at the end of the term? Been there, done that, too many times – and I have a pile of textbooks I’ll never need again to show for it.

by Thai Nguyen

4. When it’s party time, keep your head on straight (and don’t let a future employer catch you out on Facebook). It may be a stereotype, but students like to party, and there can be a lot of pressure to drink in college. If you know drinking’s not for you, don’t waste your time trying to change yourself so that you fit in. There are plenty of other things to do on the weekends, like playing ultimate frisbee in the dark, taking a day trip to a nearby city, or doing an art project with your roommates. If you do like to drink when you go out, be safe. For example, many colleges offer a late-night campus shuttle service so that no one has to drive home drunk. Whether you drink when you go out or not, though, keep your head on straight. You don’t want a potential employer or grad school admissions officer to stumble on any crazy Facebook photos three or four years from now.

5. Call your parents. Yes, even if you aren’t homesick. Parents can give you a different perspective on things and remind you of where your focus should be. They know you in a way that no one else ever will, and when you’re away at school, this can be very comforting. Not only did I call my mom when I was homesick, but I also called her when I was feeling ill and needed some OJ, or when I wanted to know how long I should broil the acorn squash I was fixing for dinner. Just don’t let all their advice get to you. There are still times when I feel like I have to do what my mom or dad suggests, but later, when I do things my way, everything turns out just fine.

It’s normal to feel a little anxious about starting college. Take things one day at a time and give yourself time to adjust. Besides, whatever you don’t figure out beforehand, you’ll learn on your own, and someday it will make for a great story!

We value the diverse voices and fresh ideas that our guest bloggers bring to BookRenter.com. However, the ideas and opinions expressed in guest posts are strictly those of the post’s author and don’t necessarily reflect the ideas or opinions of BookRenter.Com. The information in guest posts is often drawn from a variety of sources, and we count on our guest authors to verify and fact-check the content they post. BookRenter.Com makes no claims, express or implied, as to the accuracy or completeness of guest post content or the suitability of the content for a specific purpose.

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