Tag Archives: career

Major Problems

Filed under: College Life, Education, Post Grad and Career, Tips - Angelina
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Sylwia Baran Blogger Biography

 

 

 

 

One of the biggest stress factors of a college student that is deciding on a major. If you are one of the few lucky people who enter college your freshmen year with a clear idea of what you want to do for the rest of your life, then you are incredibly fortunate and this does not apply to you. However, the majority of us will change our minds at least a dozen times before we actually choose one definite major.

1. Don’t Panic

The first thing you need to do is realize that you are not alone! Most people don’t have everything figured out their freshmen year; most of us are still deliberating on our majors as sophomores, juniors and some even as seniors. So, don’t stress yourself out and go crazy just because you don’t have everything figured out yet.

2. Variety of Classes

Even if you have an idea of what you’d like to major in, it’s a very good idea to take a wide range of courses before making a concrete decision. So even if you’re a business major, take an art history or media studies course; you’ll never know what works for you until you explore different options. The more variety of courses you take, the more it will help in making the right decision.

3. Research Careers

When you have a major in mind, research what types of careers and positions you can go into with that major. Then, consider if any of these careers are something you could see yourself doing in the future. Or, research a type of career you are interested in and see what major would be needed for that position.

4. Your Interests

You don’t want to be stuck doing a job for the rest of your life that you have no interest in. When deciding on a major, consider your interests and what you’d enjoy doing. Work doesn’t seem like work if you enjoy what you do.

So don’t let this stress you out. Simply take the time to explore different majors as well as your interests and eventually you will come to a decision. Don’t create limiting time constraints for choosing a major because they may cause you to panic and not make an informed decision. And remember, you can always change your major if you change your mind, even if you have declared it!

 

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Twitter for Post-Grad

Filed under: All Things Tech, College Life, Post Grad and Career, Tips - Angelina
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Serena Piper Blogger Biography

 

 

 

 

Twitter has more than 200 million active users, so it’s safe to say some of that 200 million are employers looking to hire your highly qualified and educated self. For those of you who don’t have a Twitter account, get one. Like Facebook, it’s addicting, but unlike Facebook, it’s a bridge to employers, job opportunities, and beneficial connections. Jobvite’s 2012 Social Recruiting Survey found that “more than half (54 percent) of recruiters now use Twitter for their talent search.” It’s become an essential tool for both employers and job seekers (like college students), so get on board! Here are a few accounts to follow to get started.

1. @JobHuntOrg

Jobs, advice, and resources. Just looking over their feed, there are a lot of helpful articles, including knowing when to relocate for a job, mistakes to avoid at job interviews, and how to stand out from other job seekers.

2. @InternQueen

As I mentioned in my last post, Lauren Berger is the goto expert on finding and keeping internships, not to mention other career and workplace advice.

3. @AskAManager

“Not sure what your manager is thinking, how to ask for a raise, whether you might be in danger of getting fired, or more? Ask away.” Insight that’ll prove to be valuable. Also check out @BrazenCareerist.

4. @Ed2010

For those journalism majors who want the latest on openings in the magazine world.

5. @Lifehacker

Okay, not really job related, but still – simple tips and tricks everyone can benefit from.

6. @CollegeTownLife

“Articles, photos, videos, music & everything college.”

Other accounts to follow: your professors and university, people who work in your field of study, companies you’re interested in, etc. Build up your own following, market yourself via your profile, etc. Put yourself out there and reach out to people and companies. You never know what you’ll find.

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Portfolio: Do You Need One?

Filed under: College Life, Post Grad and Career, Tips - Angelina
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As you ease into internships and job searching, besides a resume, cover letter, and a great outfit, there’s one other thing you should be sure to have with you at any and all interviews: a portfolio.

A portfolio is a folder or case of physical evidence of related work you’ve done, paid or unpaid. A lot of colleges have classes which teach students how to put these together, so check with your school as an easy way to get it done while still earning a credit or two. Some types of things that go into a portfolio are transcripts, letters of recommendation, awards, internship jobs and responsibilities, and work samples. It’s basically an extended resume. Start collecting work samples at the beginning of your college career or as soon as possible.

When it comes to buying a portfolio, don’t just go for the most affordable. It should be professional and good quality (my favorite). Make sure to buy one that has room for everything, including room to take notes during the interview and a pocket for extra copies of your resume. If you have business cards, throw them in there too! Check craft and office supply stores, or online. Amazon has some good deals. Before you buy, you can double check with your major’s department to see what they recommend, or ask your classmates.

Now the big question: do you need a portfolio for your specific major? It’s safe to say all creative media (filmmaking, journalism, advertising, photography, graphic design, etc.), fashion and music majors need one. Don’t fall into any of these categories? If you’re a business, law, anthropology, or teaching major, you will probably be safe without one, but check with your college’s career center first.

Remember to keep your portfolio updated and error-free. You don’t want any mistakes showing up when your potential employer is flipping through your samples.

Good luck!

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Internships

Filed under: College Life, Post Grad and Career, Tips - Angelina
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Serena Piper Blogger Biography

 

 

 

 

No matter what year you are in college, it’s important to be on the lookout for internships. You don’t need me to tell you internships provide valuable hands-on experience, paid or not, and connect you to people who have an in with your dream work field. Internships are the gateway to securing a job. However, don’t just expect one to fall in your lap; finding a good internship can be a lot of work, but it’s worth it and necessary. Don’t want to be one of the thousands of students displaced and panicking after graduation? Here are a few places and ways to start searching!

1. Career Center

The people who work in the career center are pros at finding internships and jobs, and helping students perfect their resumes and cover letters. When companies are looking for interns, they often post with universities. Since you’ll be on campus anyway, stop by and check for openings.

2. Intern Queen Website

One of my favorite websites for available internships is the Intern Queen, run by internship expert Lauren Berger. It’s chock full of opportunities, career advice, and college tips. Post your resume, scroll through the listings, and even apply to become a Campus Ambassador.

3. Spread the Word

Tell everyone you know that you’re looking and, more specifically, what you’re looking for. By using social media, blogs, professors, family, and friends… word of mouth is a fast way to find connections.

4. LinkedIn

Perhaps an employer won’t use the site to reach out to you for an interview, but putting your education, experience, skills, and recommendations out there is a great way to market yourself. My current internship boss checked out my LinkedIn profile before our interview and said it played a part in her decision to interview me.

5. Call

Another way to find an internship in your desired field is to “cold call” as Intern Queen’s Lauren Berger did. When the company she wanted to work for didn’t have information about interning, she picked up the phone. So if your dream company doesn’t outright list their intern opportunities, don’t be afraid to pick up the phone!

Above all, be persistent. Attend career and internship fairs on campus, check with the alumni office, and scour any other internship sites you come across. However, don’t depend on online listings, as some sites are not frequently updated or even legitimate offerings.

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Life After College: Now What?

Filed under: Post Grad and Career, Travel & Abroad, Volunteering and Giving Back - Social Community Manager
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bio of girl

 

 

 

 

Graduating from college is a huge accomplishment, and it’s even more wonderful if you have already secured a post-grad job… but what about those of us who haven’t? Your happy little moment of celebration can easily be soured with the reminder that you don’t have your foot in the job market yet, but rest assured, there are plenty of options for the unemployed undergrad.

Join the Peace Corps

Train for six months, serve for one to two years in another country with a monthly allowance, and get paid $7,500 for your work? Yes please! There are about nine different categories volunteer work falls under, from Education and Health to HIV/AIDS and Business. Connect with a recruiter in your area to find out more about the application process, but it’s best to start early if you want to be volunteering within six months. You might not get to pick which country you go to because it’s all based on the needs of what skills you have, but it’s a great opportunity to travel, make a difference in the world, and take a break from school to let the economy recover before you job search. Not to mention, it will look great on your resume! Side note: the other option is to do Americorps, which recruits volunteers to serve here in the U.S..

Teach English as foreign language (TEFL)

Become certified to teach English in another country in as little as 4-6 weeks and all online! You may be able to find a program overseas that doesn’t require you to be

certified, but most employers look for people who are. With the TEFL certificate, you can teach in a variety of countries, such as Japan, Thailand, Indonesia, European countries, and South America. If you think you might want to teach, consider the very basic TEFL certificate. Even with the basic certificate, it’s a great resource to have if you want the means to live anywhere you wish. 

Just travel

A lot of people I’ve talked to seem to have one thing in common as far as what they regretted not doing after college: traveling. If you have long lost relatives overseas, take advantage of the connection and give them a call or send an email to catch up. Usually, families are more than welcoming when it comes to hosting. Since housing and food is already hooked up, all you’ll have to worry about is your round-trip plane ticket (assuming you want to come home!).

Still feeling stuck? It’s important to remember not to panic. You always have options; just put the time and research into seeing exactly what they are. The more research you do on your own, the better you’ll feel and the better choice you’ll make.

 

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