Tag Archives: advice

Don’t Fall Behind: Keeping Up With Classes

Filed under: College Life, Education, Tips - Angelina
Tags: , ,

Sylwia Baran BookRenter Blogger Biography

 

 

 

 

One of the greatest things about college is the new found freedom. We no longer have our parents nagging us to make sure that our homework is done and that we studied for the math test – it’s amazing! And yet, it’s not so amazing. We soon learn that support system that was pushing us to perform well in school is greatly missed and a lot of students struggle to keep up with their workload when those daily reminders are no longer in place. That is why it is so important to learn how to properly manage your time and develop skills that will ensure you don’t fall behind in your classes.

Keep up with your classes with these simple tips:

1. Schedule Study Time

When you’re in college, you have a lot more going on in your life than just your courses. Most students also have part-time jobs, extracurricular activities, family they like to visit, and maybe even a social life to tend to once in a while. That is why it’s important to set aside a certain amount of time each day to study and do homework. Plan out a couple of hours each day that you will dedicate solely to school work – and stick to the schedule!

2. Stay Ahead of the Syllabus

The syllabus is there for a reason – use it! No one is saying that you have to do all of the assigned readings for the semester in the first week of classes, but keep an eye out for what’s to come. If you find that you have some extra time, start doing the readings for the following week. If you know that you will have a big assignment towards the end of the semester, start thinking of ideas and even do some light research for it. Staying ahead of the deadlines takes a lot of stress out of the college experience.

3. Show up

This may seem silly to some of you, but many students enter college with the idea that you don’t have to show up to all your classes to do well. That new found freedom I mentioned earlier plays a big role here. It’s much easier to stay in your big comfy warm bed for a few extra hours rather than going to class at 8:00AM in the snow – believe me, I think there’s a consensus on that. But missing even one day of class can be really detrimental to your grade. Especially when you only have that class once a week, there is probably a ton of material that you’re missing. No matter how comfortable your bed is, get up and get to your classes!

If you still find yourself struggling to keep up with the heavy course load, talk to someone in your school. Colleges offer tutoring and help with dealing with these types of problems; use these resources!

What’s your secret to keeping up with your classes? Tell us in a comment below.

Add a Comment



How To Be Prepared For The New Semester

Filed under: College Life, Education, Tips - Angelina
Tags: , ,

Sylwia BaranBookRenter Blogger Biography

 

How you start off a semester in college can be indicative of how the rest of the semester will be.  You don’t want to start off as a stressed out wreck – you want to be cool, calm, and collected. This is why it is so important to be prepared before the semester even starts.

Here are a few ways to prepare for the upcoming semester:

 

1. Plan Out Your Route

Plan out the fastest and most desirable route to take to get to your classes. Familiarize yourself with the area and different roads in case of any unforeseen issues that may arise during the semester.

 

2. Create A Budget

Before the semester begins, figure out how much spending money you have (or will have) and create a budget now. Estimate your spending on groceries, books, etc.. You may not be able to stick to the exact plan you create now, but at least you’ll have an idea of how much money you have and you’ll spend smarter.

 

3. Research Your Classes and Your Professors

If you don’t like to dive into a semester completely unaware of what to expect, do a little bit of research. www.ratemyprofessor.com is a great source that I used to find out what students have had to say about the professors and classes that I was about to start. But, while this can give you a little bit of an idea of what to expect, it’s important to not judge a class or a professor solely on a review before you experience it yourself. Keep an open mind!

 

4. Order Your Books

It can be a real drag to purchase books after your classes have already began. Many professors may already expect you to have read certain chapters for the second class and then you’re stressing out trying to get the book as soon as possible. It’s best to eliminate any extra stress and simply rent/purchase your books before classes even begin. And hey, I just happen to know a great site with awesome prices from which you can rent your books! Check us out at www.bookrenter.com!
The goal of all this preparing is to eliminate as much stress as possible from the semester as you can. You want to start each semester feeling ready and confident. Prepare yourself for a great semester! Keep an open mind, learn new things, and enjoy yourself.

 

What are some things you are doing now to prepare for the new school year?

Add a Comment



Staying Academically & Professionally Oriented During Summer

Filed under: College Life, Education, Post Grad and Career, Tips - Angelina
Tags: , , ,

Serena Piper Blogger Biography

 

 

 

 

Summer is notorious for college students to “take a break” from school, chill out a little, and relax after having relatively high stress levels. But, sometimes we can get a little too laid back, not realizing that even though it’s summer, we still have homework. Yes, homework during the summer – and I’m not talking about summer school (but that does count too!). No matter if you’re a senior, freshman, junior, sophomore, or recently graduated – it’s crucial to always be focusing on the future of your academics and career, even when you are in need of a serious life-pause.

If you need a little inspiration on ways you can continue to work towards your life goals, here are some ideas:

1. Create A Vision Board

This is a strategy a lot of people in well-known positions use, including celebrities. Get a bulletin board and pin to it all the places you want to be able to go, all the things you would like to do, and pictures of what you want your life to look like. Every time you see it, you’ll feel that little spritz of motivation to keep focused and stay strong. It’s a good reminder that there is a light at the end of the tunnel.

2. Find A Support Group

Since you’re on Twitter and Facebook most of the time anyway, put that time to good use and find social groups and accounts to follow that support 20-somethings trying to find their way. Type in a few keywords, such as “college,” “postgrad,” “motivation,” and you’re on your way. Not hooked into social media? Type those same words into Google to bring up a variety of local support group you can join for meetings. You can share your struggles and successes with each other, share resources, and network.

3. Make A List

Create a list of all the things you have accomplished thus far. It’s super easy to get stuck in that rut of negative thinking by focusing on all the things you have to do, things you haven’t done, and things you should have done by [insert age here]. Change this around and make a list once a week of things you’ve accomplished, no matter how small. Tried a new meal at a restaurant? Add it to the list. The little accomplishments will measure how well you’re progressing. In addition, whenever you catch yourself in the rut of that negative thinking, stop yourself and replace it with a hopeful, optimistic thought.

4. Work On A Portfolio

Depending on your major, a portfolio is a crucial piece to have on hand for interviews, or for handing over to a career advisor at your university. A second pair of eyes never hurts, and if you already have one going, add to it, update it, and keep it fresh. Taking a look at it periodically is another great reminder of what it is you’re working toward.

5. Interview Someone With Your Dream Job

Is there someone in particular you strive to be like? Reach out to interview them, find out how they got where they are, and draw your inspiration from your new muse. Can’t get there contact information? Look for someone who has a position similar. Make sure when you ask them about their job, you find out how they stayed motivated. It never hurts to gain new ideas.

Do you have any secrets for staying driven? Share them with us!

Add a Comment



5 Biggest Resume Mistakes

Filed under: College Life, Post Grad and Career, Tips - Angelina
Tags: , , ,

Sylwia BaranBookRenter Blogger Biography

A resume is the very first impression you make on any possible future employers. Before you even have a chance to charm your interviewer with your wit and humor, they have to first like your resume. Therefore, it is crucial that your resume is impressive, professional, and on-point. Don’t make silly mistakes that can potentially cost you a job.

Avoid these resume mistakes and you could be on your way to your next interview:

1. Forgetting to Proofread

This is the number one mistake that job applicants make that has a huge impact on a resume review and yet can be so easily avoided. Make sure to read your resume over several times before sending out a final copy. Then after you’ve read it, have a friend read it over too in case you missed anything. It’s better to be safe than sorry!

2. Lying

Although it’s usually okay to embellish a little bit about your responsibilities at previous jobs, do not put down blatant lies. If you do not know how to use certain computer software that the job you are applying for requires, don’t say you do know how to use it in the hopes of figuring it out if you get the job! This will not work and you will just end up looking like a liar and feeling embarrassed.  Then your whole overall value as a reliable employee will be tarnished, and may even cost you the position.

3. Not Enough Detail

If you are a recent college graduate, you are probably desperately applying to 20 different jobs each day, so your natural instinct may tell you to simplify this process by creating a generic resume that you can quickly send out that generalizes your skills to apply to all of the jobs you are applying for. Do not do this. It is tempting because it is easy, but make the time to tweak your resume to be specific to each job that you apply for. Use the same key words from the posted job description to fill into your resume. The person reviewing your resume will see you obtain all the skills required for the job and may ask you to come in for an interview. It is more beneficial to send out 8 resumes that are more personalized and detail-oriented, than to send out 20 cookie-cutter resumes.

4. Rambling

More information is not always the best. Using superfluous words and rambling just to fill space on the page does not indicate more experience for the job. It may actually do more harm than good. It’s good to keep a resume short to the point. As the saying goes, quality is better than quantity.

5. Unprofessional Presentation

Resumes should be clean, not crumbled, typed in black ink (unless you are applying for graphic design), with consistent font face and size. Your resume should not only read as professional, but should also look that way as well. It should be aesthetically pleasing to the eye, but also nothing crazy. Use traditional formatting and make sure it is easy to read. When in doubt, clean and simple is the best way to go.

Put some effort and time into your resume each time you apply for a job. You may be anxious (that’s normal) to just applying to any job you come across that looks decent, but don’t just throw yourself into applying without taking the time to present yourself in the best light for the position. Your resume is your golden ticket to get called in for an interview, so be sure to treat it as an important step in the application process!

Share your resume tips with us in the comments below!

Add a Comment



Crash Guide To Acing Finals: Suggestions From A Senior

Filed under: College Life, Education, Tips - Angelina
Tags: , ,

BookRenter Blogger Biography Cameron Tranchemontagne

Some people handle finals better than others, but for the majority of the college student population this is an incredibly stressful time. Time after time again, I have seen my peers work themselves into a state of perpetual anxiety induced by their fears over the outcome of their finals. They either feel that they have not studied enough, worry they studied the wrong material, or they let their procrastination get the best of them. But, when students obsessively worry about their finals, it can have detrimental effects. Some students find it harder to focus on individual tasks because of the sheer overwhelming amount of work constantly dividing their attention; some can’t sleep or force themselves to stay awake for unhealthy amounts of time; some turn to unhealthy decisions like Adderall (which should only be taken in small doses and only if prescribed by a doctor), which can cause liver damage and even addiction.

Finals can be stressful, but there are ways to overcome this challenge and walk away with pride.

Anxiety

I have struggled with anxiety in the past until I became a lazy and unmotivated teenager. I still struggle staying motivated to do my work, but I have come to realize that by being more laid back and not worrying so much about the material, I actually began to improve on my test and essay scores. I could more easily recall the information I had learned in class or studied for homework just by being more calm and collected. Then this brought confidence. If you feel that you are overwhelmed and drowning in work, take a break. Take a moment to think, reflect, breathe, and then plan out how you are going to approach your workload. Once you break it down on paper and have a solid plan, that Mt. Everest of work and responsibility is diminished to nothing but a bunny slope.

Preparation

Simply telling yourself “everything is going to be ok” is not enough (but it helps with anxiety). You actually have to put in the work. Write down your plan of what you want to get done and how long it will take to accomplish. I like to write down my plan in a personal agenda or calendar, but plenty of people are more inclined to use their phones or tablets. In each box (day), I write down what I want to accomplish for that day and I mark the due date for assignments. For example, I may write in the box for 5/11 that I want to work on an introduction to an essay that is due Friday. I write in the Friday box what time the essay is due. I continue to break down the assignment throughout the week to make the assignment easier and less daunting. Having a specific plan and visualizing due dates can help to keep you on task and organized.

Take Breaks

Finally, as mentioned before, don’t forget to take a break once in a while. Most experts agree that studying in 1 hour blocks with 15 minute breaks is the most effective way to study. That is not to say that you should follow this model perfectly. Sometimes when I am studying, I like to keep going even past an hour just to keep my momentum up. I generally just take a break once I start having difficulty focusing. This is a signal to me that my brain is tiring and can no longer stay on one task. No matter how long it takes you, once you start to feel brain-dead, take a quick break. Get up from your workstation to get a change of scenery and work your blood flow. Try to find something else that will engage your brain and/or body. Playing music, taking a walk, getting a snack, or talking to a friend are all great break-time activities. Just remember to keep it short. Sometimes a “quick break” can easily derail a perfectly good study session.

Sleep Well

Make sure you are getting enough sleep. The brain simply cannot function at full capacity when it is sleep deprived. This will just make things harder for yourself. Avoid late night cram sessions and definitely do not pull an all-nighter, no matter how desperate you may be to study material. You will be guaranteed to crash during your exam if you do. Sleep actually helps memory function and helps to keep focus, which are things that are definitely needed for finals.

Always remember that if you don’t get your desired grade on a final, it is not going to ruin your life. Surround yourself with positivity. Listen to some feel-good music, hangout or study with your best friends, and always remember: everything is going to be okay. Everyone has the potential to do well; never doubt your abilities. Just give your best shot at finals – giving anything less than your best, will only cheat yourself.

Good luck!

Add a Comment