Tag Archives: advice

Signing Off

Filed under: Digital Interns, Tips - Angelina
Tags: , ,

Crystal Keefe Blogger Biography

 

 

 

 

Well, fellow readers, it is time for me to say farewell. Writing this is bittersweet.  While I am incredibly excited for what lies ahead (college graduation, moving, and starting my new career), I am sad to be leaving BookRenter.

The past nine months as a Social Media Digital Intern for this unbelievable company have been amazing.  I have loved every second and could not have imagined a better experience.

I leave you with these last words of advice and encouragement during your college years.

Don’t turn down an opportunity just because it may not exactly fit your career path.  Had I only been open to education based internships, I never would have found BookRenter.  Be open to any and all opportunities that are presented to you during your four years in college because they truly do set you up for your future.

I have been able to use so many of the things I have learned while at BookRenter to help expand my horizons and further my teaching career.

Thank you to all of those who have read my blogs and supported me these past nine months and a big thank you to BookRenter!

Sincerely,

Crystal Keefe

Add a Comment



Friendly Distractions

Filed under: College Life, Education, Social Life/Relationships, Tips - Angelina
Tags: , ,

Bailey Buckingham Blogger Biography

 

 

 

 

Friends are great and I’m glad to have them. I’m not always happy to have certain friends in my class though. There are some friends that you love to death, but make you want to run for the door sometimes. Now picture that person sitting with you every single day in class while you’re trying to be a good student! This has happened to me several times. Without losing them as a friend, I’ve figured out a few ways to get myself through it and so will you!

1. Find Out Which Classes Your Friends Are In

Find out in advance so it won’t be a shock the day of. Talk to that person about how they are in class and what they want to get out of it. This will help you figure out what you’re up against. Just take a deep breath and know it’s only one semester!

2. Distance Yourself

Make a conscious decision to not sit by a friend. There were days when I wanted to sit next to my friend so that I could talk to them about my weekend, but I knew I couldn’t. They never got offended and actually understood why. In the end, he dropped the class and I got an A. Sometimes you really do just need to sit somewhere else, and it will make all the difference.

3. Talk To Them

Don’t be passive aggressive. Don’t be aggressive, either. Just be a friend and let them know that you can’t slack off in this class. If that means not sitting by them, don’t be afraid to tell them the truth. From experience, honesty is the best policy. Your friend will appreciate you not lying to them, and you will appreciate the better grade at the end of the semester.

Distracting Group of Student Friends in Classroom

Photo © leodpaiva

Like I said, friends are great. I love my friends, but I have to look after myself and make sure I’m doing everything I can to succeed. If you’re reading this and you’ve been on the other side of the equation…We love you, and we just want both of us to be better in class! This semester I have a class with my husband for the first time, let’s hope I won’t need to use my own tips on him!

Add a Comment



Moving Tips

Filed under: College Life, Post Grad and Career, Social Life/Relationships, Tips, Travel & Abroad - Angelina
Tags: , ,

Serena Piper Blogger Biography

 

 

 

 

It’s the start of a new year, which means the start of a lot of new things in your life. You could be graduating college soon, starting a new job, joining the Peace Corp., or pursuing graduate school. Whatever it is, it will probably eventually involve having to move. Depending on what you’re moving for, it might be quite a milestone, but don’t let all the excitement make you overlook taking care of anything at your current place. I’ve moved more times than I can count, and each time I learn something new about the process – here are a few tips; some old, some new.

1. Checklist

Live with roommates? If so, it helps to make a checklist of your items in each room about a week before the move. Go through each corner of every room and write down what’s yours. When it comes time to pack, you can go through the list and rest assured you didn’t leave anything behind.

Written Packing List of Things

Photo © kylesteed

2. Keys

Instead of just leaving your house/mail key with a roommate, check with your landlord to see who you should leave extras with. You never know what will cost extra money.

Set of keys

Photo © Swell Dame

3. Verification

This is just a precaution to be on the safe side, have your landlord sign a form saying you are officially off any lease you signed when you first moved in.

Signature for Release from Lease

Photo © immsm

4. Mail

Most people don’t submit a change of address until a day or two before they move, but I recommend doing it as much as four or five days before, if possible, as it takes some companies awhile to catch up. This also ensures nothing slips by from major accounts.

Pile of Mail, Letters, and Packages

Photo © Warm 'n Fuzzy

5. Document

Do a cleaning walk-through with your landlord before you move out to make sure you’ve done an acceptable job. Be sure to take photos as proof of how you left the place. This includes fixtures, door trimmings, window blinds, etc.

Clean Empty Apartment

Photo © CharlieBoy808

My two biggest pieces of advice? Start early and take this time to go through your things and purge items you no longer use. No one likes moving a lot of stuff, so the more you find that you don’t use anymore, the better it is to donate. Also, depending on where you live, different rental companies have different move-out requirements, so double check those!

Happy moving!

Add a Comment



Advice to My Freshman-Self

Filed under: College Life, Tips - Angelina
Tags: , , ,

This is Part 3 in a series of letters from college students to their freshman alter egos. (Here’s Part 2 on how to think epic as a freshman) Knowing what you know now, what advice would you give your younger self about your college years?

Blogger Bio

 

 

 

 

Dear Freshman-Self,

You’re now out of high school, and it’s finally time to start college. You are packing up your stuff, moving out of state and preparing to go to college. What an amazing opportunity! You will meet new faces who will know nothing about you and nothing about who you have been. Do not be afraid to jump in head first and make new friends!

As far as classes go, your Spanish class will be A LOT easier than you expect. You will actually understand math for once, and you should really try to pay more attention in that earth science class. Also, PLEASE try to take it easy on yourself. College is a whole new ball game. You may have been able to pull off doing it all in high school, but do not stretch yourself too thin. It may seem like a great idea, but when you start to realize how much time school, work, and keeping up with a social life actually takes up, you may be shocked at the task you signed yourself up for. It all seems like a good idea in the beginning, but remember to make limits!

Believe it or not, you will meet some of the best friends you have ever had during your college years. It may seem hard to focus on school when you have these new and exciting friends, but it is possible to make time for both. Get yourself that planner that has been on your shopping list for the last few weeks and schedule time for you and for them. After you are late to a few shifts at work and have mini heart attacks over forgotten due dates, you will regret not buying that planner sooner

Freshman Group in College

My Freshman-Self, Front and Center!

School will be great, but be prepared for some problems to come your way during your years. Choose your battles wisely and know that not every problem that comes up is earth shattering. You are much stronger than anything that a teacher, friend, or guy can throw at you.

 

Your Future-Self,

Megan

View Comment | Add a Comment



If You Could Talk to Your Freshman Self, What Would You Say?

Filed under: College Life, Post Grad and Career - Social Community Manager
Tags: , , , ,

This is Part 1 in a series of letters from college graduates to their freshman alter egos. Knowing what you know now, what advice would you give your younger self about your college years?

photo of girlBy BookRenter Corporate Communications Associate, Rachel Freeman
Rachel recently earned her Master’s degree at San Francisco State in Broadcast & Electronic Communication Arts. In addition to working at Rafter, she coaches high school volleyball. A kid at heart, she loves watermelon gum and water guns. In her spare time, you can find her traveling the globe (her favorite place is Israel!) and cheering on her hometown San Francisco Giants.

 

Dear freshman Rachel,

I’ll give you fair warning. By the time you are done with this adventure of higher education, you’ll have been in school for 19 of your 23 years. That’s a long time: exactly 82.6% of your life. And when you get to the finish line, your graduate school graduation, it will feel like the end of an era. School can be tough at times, but it’s a fun journey and you should take in everything: every friendship, every class, every event, every party. So as you embark on this awkward, fun, funny, stressful, amazing time in your life that I wish I could do again, here are some things I want to tell you:

snow angels-        Break out of the box you have created for yourself! When you were young, you pictured your life at 18 in a certain way. And that box is very restricting and claustrophobic. So step out of that box. Get out and party. Do things you may never have thought of doing –  introduce yourself to random people with whom you cross paths, join off-the-wall active clubs (think, the Rock Climbing Club, or the Swing Dance Club), and take off-campus adventures with your new friends (think corn mazes, hay rides and haunted houses). You won’t regret leaving your box behind.

-        Find people who make you a better person. Surround yourself with people who genuinely care about you and what you are doing in your life. You will encounter people who may have selfish reasons for hanging out with you. You don’t need to be suspicious of everyone, but make sure that you get something out of the relationship. If not, don’t be afraid to stick up for yourself. It’s okay to be a little selfish; after all, you’re the only one looking out for you.

-        Live a little! I know you don’t believe in drinking before you turn 21, but it’s not so bad. When people invite you to parties, GO! I know you think right now that it will be uncomfortable, but trust me, IT WON’T BE; everyone is just there to have a good time. And if you decide you want to start drinking before 21, it’s really not as bad as you think. Go with your gut. But never do anything because someone else tells you to. I just want you to know it’s okay if your views change over time.

-        Not everyone makes it through college with amazing roommates. And you are no exception. But instead of being upset about not having a college roommate that you’ll still be friends with in 30 years, think of these living situations as learning experiences. It’s teaching you about cohabitating, patience and not always getting what you want all the time. And those will be great skills to have when you finally do enter the real world (especially the “not always getting what you want” part).

-        Lastly, work hard to maintain friendships with those you truly care about. Even with Facebook and Twitter and YouTube and FourSquare and every other social network out there telling you what your friends are doing at all times, it won’t be enough to maintain those special friendships. Once you graduate from undergrad, pick up the phone and call your friends, send them “thinking of you” texts, snail mail them birthday cards. You may think your friendships will dissipate after college, but as long as you work on keeping in touch, they will actually strengthen.

So freshman self, I will leave you with 2 quotes. One comes from a future best friend. She once said: “Life is short, so fuck everything. These are the years. You can make mistakes. If you’re gonna make mistakes, do it now before 25 at least. After 30, you’re DONE! DUNZO! Out for the count.” Not sure if the part about turning 30 is true because I haven’t hit that milestone yet, but it’s still a good one.

And finally, Eleanor Roosevelt once said, “Do one thing every day that scares you.” If you live your life that way, I can guarantee you, you’ll be fearless.

Love,
Rachel Freeman, M.A.

Add a Comment