Category Archives: Tips

The Ultimate Guide For College Finals

Filed under: College Life, Education, Tips - Angelina
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Serena Piper BookRenter Blogger Biography

 

 

 

 

Are you freaking out about college finals? Relax; it’s only natural! Pretty much every student has worried about finals at some point. It’s always helped calm me down to remember that I’m not the only one stressing over finals week. We’re in this together!

Throughout my four years of college, I’ve learned a handful of study tips that I’ve come back to time and time again. Here is my guide to college finals:

1. Prioritize

It was easier for me to prioritize what to study, instead of trying to make sure I spent equal amounts of time studying for each final. There are several ways you can decide which final to study for first: the one you’re most worried about passing, the final you’ll have first, or the final that has the most material. I think the safe rule to play by is focusing more of your time on the tests you’re most worried about. Familiarize yourself with enough of all of your material to feel a general confidence.

2. Create Study Guides

If you’re a procrastinator (like yours truly), the sooner you start this step, the better! Many professors will provide their own version of a study guide, but it may not be laid out in a way that makes sense to you. It would be wise to type out (or re-write) all of your notes you’ve taken throughout the term and make a packet of important terms, diagrams, theories, examples, etc. Take the time to create your own study guide. Flashcards are also great, too.

3. Do the Practice Tests

Does your professor create practice tests for each chapter? Are there some in your textbook at the end of each section? I used to pass them by, too, but for some classes, they can be really helpful, especially math. Practice does make perfect!

4. Take Your Time

When it is crunch time and you’re sitting in your seat during the final, take your time! I used to panic if I saw someone turn in their test only after 20. I would think maybe the final was really simple and it shouldn’t be taking me so long to finish it. Wrong. Just because someone else finished before me, that doesn’t mean anything about the test itself. We all work at our own pace. So read the problem slowly and think about your answer. Don’t rush and don’t worry about others around you.

5. Attend Review Sessions

Even if it’s during the time of your favorite television show, make sure you’re at the final exam review session! It’s never a bad thing to be over-prepared. There is no such thing as too much reviewing. Plus, your instructor might tell you something only those at the review session have the advantage of knowing. This is also your last chance to ask any questions you might have.

Follow this guide to college finals and you should do just fine.

Relax, you’ve got this! Keep calm and study on! Good luck!

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The Importance Of Networking And Why You Should Start Now

Filed under: College Life, Post Grad and Career, Social Life/Relationships, Tips - Angelina
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Serena Piper BookRenter Blogger Biography

 

 

 

 

Believe it or not, the term “networking” isn’t just something people on LinkedIn throw around to sound important or intelligent. If you’re new to the term, it’s simply a professional way of saying, “making friends and professional connections” with people interested or working in the same areas of study as you are no matter what your experience level is.

Nowadays, many college students just use social media to further connect with friends, family, and professionals who have our dream job. When I started seriously pursuing journalism as my major, Twitter was my favorite way to get in touch with fellow writers, editors, and other students at both my own university and others. Looking back, although I had several valuable internships using my journalism skills, I probably should’ve attended more actual in-person networking events available to me through my university. When it comes to networking, it’s important to not only start early in your college career, but to take advantage of every opportunity that comes your way to meet like-minded people.

When it comes to your future, make networking your best friend. The connections you make are the people who can help further your career during or after college.

1. It Could Help You Find An Internship

Thanks to LinkedIn and Twitter, I found at least three of my college internships by networking with the editors of the magazines I was interested in. When you engage in tweets posted by the people you’re interested in, you never know where it might lead. Potential employers love seeing that an internship or job candidate already shows interest in their company. If you were the employer, would you hire the person who only submitted an application, or the person who interacted with you on online too? If you end up with a job or internship, or even just an unpaid side gig on the weekends doing what you’re studying, that’s the best way to learn and to be better prepared for when you find your permanent career.

2. You Will Learn More

Networking with individuals interested or working in a similar field of interest as you will allow you to learn more about your field that you might not normally deal with. You will learn more details of opportunities, ways of doing things, all while getting peer support. Build a strong enough of a connection and you could have a potential reference for future research or professional growth.

3. It Could Lead To a Job

Did you know 70-80% of jobs aren’t advertised? Most are found through networking. Remember the saying, it’s not always what you know, but who you know? Well, get to know more people and more opportunities might come knocking! Especially if you connect on LinkedIn, chances of finding a job are really high. Or, your connections could very well become a person of reference for your next interview! You never know!

Start networking early. If you start while you’re still a college student, you will have a great advantage come graduation.

Share your networking strategies with us in a comment below!

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Preparing For College Class Registration

Filed under: College Life, Education, Tips - Angelina
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Cameron Tranchemontagne BookRenter Blogger Biography

Sometimes registering for college courses can be extremely stressful and chaotic. You may not know what you actually need to take for credits to graduate, or which general education classes are the easiest so you can focus on your thesis, or maybe even you’re a freshman and you have no idea where to begin.

Take a breath and read this quick class registration guide to help steer you in the right direction:

1. Preparation

If you’re a returning student, take a look at the classes you’ve already taken. How many credits have you completed and how many do you still need to complete? What are you goals? What else are you interested in (besides your major) that you could maybe take to complement your major? There’s a lot of questions to ask yourself to help you prepare for your next set of courses. After answering these questions, you should have a clearer picture about what classes you should apply for. It may help to write this all down so you can see your plan in front of you and follow it like a checklist.

2. Meet With Your Advisor

The next thing you need to do is meet with your advisor. In most cases, you can’t get your online registration access code until you meet with them anyway, but they can also be helpful. You might have to schedule a time for a meeting, so try to do this sooner than later, even if you haven’t finished your preparation yet. Just make sure you have somewhat of a plan by the time of the meeting. Don’t forget that the point of an advisor is to advise you on your college path, so if you’re stuck, your advisor is there to help you.

3. Register

The last thing you need to do is actually register. This should be easy if you’re prepared. Search for the classes you need by their course registration number so that you make sure you get the exact class and section you want. Go for your priority classes first, the ones you need to graduate, and then you can worry about the others. Try to be the first to log on if registration is online because most of the time the classes are first come, first serve. If you don’t get into one before it fills up, this is where having a back-up plan on hand comes in handy. And if you still don’t get everything you need, your advisor and the professor may be able to pull some strings for you, so don’t be afraid to ask!

It’s normal to not get every class you want, so don’t let it stress you out. It will all work out just fine.

Share a comment with us about your class registration tips!

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Is It A Spring Fling, Or The Real Thing?

Filed under: College Life, Living, Social Life/Relationships, Tips - Angelina
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Christine Henson BookRenter Blogger Biography

 

Relationships are almost always tricky. It can be especially challenging trying to figure out for college students and those in new relationships. So, how do you know if it’s just a spring fling or the real thing? Here are few things to think about to help you figure out what kind of relationship you might be in.

1. Do You Talk Daily?

If the answer is yes, then it could be the real thing. If this person makes the effort to call or text you every day without fail, then they are definitely interested. If you’re answer is no, or sometimes, then it might be just a fling. Also notice if it’s always you to be the one to reach out first. If so, try waiting for them to contact you to see if they make the effort.

2. Do They Make You Laugh?

It can be easy to make a person laugh when you first meet, because everything is fun and easy. The real challenge is to find someone who will make you laugh even when life is boring.

3. Do You Have Similar Interests?

Sure, you had similar interests over spring break (having fun and forgetting about school are all anybody cares about then). What about now that you’re back to your day-to-day life? Do you still care about the same things? Maybe you both care about having an active social life, or studying a lot to get good grades. If you do then it could be the beginning of something great.

4. Have You Made Plans To See Each Other?

It could be the real thing if either of you has made plans to see the other person again. It is definitely the real thing if you have made the effort to see each other several times since you first met. If you haven’t seen each other in a while and visits are far and few between, then a relationship is not looking very good.

5. How Do They Look At You?

This can be a bit cheesy, but there really is a certain way a person looks at another person when they care about them. You’ll know it when you see it, because it’s unmistakable. If you’ve seen this look, you’ll know you’re relationship is the real deal.

Whether or not it’s just a spring fling, getting to know someone new is always fun. Even if it doesn’t end up in a committed relationship, you could’ve met someone who will be in your life forever, only time will tell!

Are you in a relationship? Share how you knew your relationship was a fling or real thing in a comment below!

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How To Write The Perfect Paper

Filed under: College Life, Education, Tips - Angelina
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Megan Lehman BookRenter Blogger Biography

 

Every college student writes papers and assignments. What is surprising though is how poorly written some college papers can be. I am a writing fellow at the University of Iowa, where we boast our writing program as being number one in the country.  After reading, reviewing, and editing many papers on many different topics, I have noticed some common mistakes students make when writing a paper.

I’ve put together a quick list of tips to avoid these errors and write the perfect paper:

1. Outline

When I first learned how to outline a paper, I thought it was an enormous waste of my time and that I didn’t need to make outline because I could think my paper through while writing it out. Well, after writing my thesis, a paper that required more work than anything I’ve ever had to do before, I learned the true value in an outline. I got to the second half of my thesis paper and found it extremely difficult to know where the paper was going. Outlining all my ideas gave me the opportunity to see what would work well and what would not. Take the extra hour or so to make the outline. This will allow you to clearly layout your thoughts and keep organized. It’s a lot easier to move thoughts on an outline around than it is to re-write a whole section of your paper!

2. Read It Out Loud

I know this sounds silly, but reading your paper aloud to yourself is by far the easiest and most simple way to find errors in your writing. Things like inappropriate commas and run-on sentences are overwhelmingly common in papers, from the junior high level all the way up to the graduating college seniors.  By reading it out loud, you can hear all these simple mistakes.

3. Writing Centers and Tutors

Your college writing center is an obvious way to improve your writing. After surveying students on multiple campuses, I learned that most students avoid the writing center for a few reasons: they don’t want to hear bad things about their writing, they don’t want to take the time to make or attend the appointment, or they may not even know about it. I understand the busy schedule of a college student. However, the writing center is designed to help you, so make time. Plus, you already pay for this service in your tuition. So, you should use what you’re paying for!

I am shocked every time I read college-level papers. It’s okay for some students to not be natural writers – but they should be taking full advantage of every resource possible to improve their skills, that’s part of what college is about.

Keep on writing! Share your writing tips with us in a comment below!

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